Dpp dependent Hematopoietic stem cells give rise to Hh dependent blood progenitors in larval lymph gland of Drosophila

  1. Nidhi Sharma Dey
  2. Parvathy Ramesh
  3. Mayank Chugh
  4. Sudip Mandal
  5. Lolitika Mandal  Is a corresponding author
  1. Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, India
  2. University of Tuebingen, Germany

Abstract

Drosophila hematopoiesis bears striking resemblance with that of vertebrates, both in the context of distinct phases and the signaling molecules. Even though, there has been no evidence of Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in Drosophila, the larval lymph gland with its Hedgehog dependent progenitors served as an invertebrate model of progenitor biology. Employing lineage-tracing analyses, we have now identified Notch expressing HSCs in the first instar larval lymph gland. Our studies clearly establish the hierarchical relationship between Notch expressing HSCs and the previously described Domeless expressing progenitors. These HSCs require Decapentapelagic (Dpp) signal from the hematopoietic niche for their maintenance in an identical manner to vertebrate aorta-gonadal-mesonephros (AGM) HSCs. Thus, this study not only extends the conservation across these divergent taxa, but also provides a new model that can be exploited to gain better insight into the AGM related Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs).

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Nidhi Sharma Dey

    Developmental Genetics Laboratory, Department of Biological Sciences, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Mohali, India
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Parvathy Ramesh

    Developmental Genetics Laboratory, Department of Biological Sciences, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Mohali, India
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Mayank Chugh

    Cellular Nanoscience, Center for Plant Molecular Biology, University of Tuebingen, Tübingen, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Sudip Mandal

    Molecular Cell and Developmental Biology Laboratory, Department of Biological Sciences, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Mohali, India
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Lolitika Mandal

    Developmental Genetics Laboratory, Department of Biological Sciences, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Mohali, India
    For correspondence
    lolitika@iisermohali.ac.in
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-7711-6090

Funding

WellcomeTrust DBT Alliance (500124/Z09/Z)

  • Lolitika Mandal

Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Pune

  • Nidhi Sharma Dey
  • Parvathy Ramesh
  • Mayank Chugh
  • Sudip Mandal
  • Lolitika Mandal

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Yukiko M Yamashita, University of Michigan, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: May 30, 2016
  2. Accepted: October 25, 2016
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: October 26, 2016 (version 1)
  4. Accepted Manuscript updated: October 31, 2016 (version 2)
  5. Version of Record published: November 23, 2016 (version 3)
  6. Version of Record updated: November 30, 2016 (version 4)
  7. Version of Record updated: September 11, 2019 (version 5)

Copyright

© 2016, Dey et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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  1. Nidhi Sharma Dey
  2. Parvathy Ramesh
  3. Mayank Chugh
  4. Sudip Mandal
  5. Lolitika Mandal
(2016)
Dpp dependent Hematopoietic stem cells give rise to Hh dependent blood progenitors in larval lymph gland of Drosophila
eLife 5:e18295.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18295

Further reading

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