1. Cell Biology
  2. Chromosomes and Gene Expression
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A dynamic mode of mitotic bookmarking by transcription factors

  1. Sheila S Teves
  2. Luye An
  3. Anders S Hansen
  4. Liangqi Xie
  5. Xavier Darzacq
  6. Robert Tjian  Is a corresponding author
  1. University of California, Berkeley, United States
Research Article
  • Cited 87
  • Views 7,619
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Cite this article as: eLife 2016;5:e22280 doi: 10.7554/eLife.22280

Abstract

During mitosis, transcription is shut off, chromatin condenses, and most transcription factors (TFs) are reported to be excluded from chromosomes. How do daughter cells re-establish the original transcription program? Recent discoveries that a select set of TFs remain bound on mitotic chromosomes suggest a potential mechanism for maintaining transcriptional programs through the cell cycle termed mitotic bookmarking. Here we report instead that many TFs remain associated with chromosomes in mouse embryonic stem cells, and that the exclusion previously described is largely a fixation artifact. In particular, most TFs we tested are significantly enriched on mitotic chromosomes. Studies with Sox2 reveal that this mitotic interaction is more dynamic than in interphase and is facilitated by both DNA binding and nuclear import. Furthermore, this dynamic mode results from lack of transcriptional activation rather than decreased accessibility of underlying DNA sequences in mitosis. The nature of the cross-linking artifact prompts careful re-examination of the role of TFs in mitotic bookmarking.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Sheila S Teves

    Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-1220-2414
  2. Luye An

    Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  3. Anders S Hansen

    Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  4. Liangqi Xie

    Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  5. Xavier Darzacq

    Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  6. Robert Tjian

    Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, United States
    For correspondence
    jmlim@berkeley.edu
    Competing interests
    Robert Tjian, President of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (2009-present), one of the three founding funders of eLife, and a member of eLife's Board of Directors.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-0539-8217

Funding

Howard Hughes Medical Institute

  • Robert Tjian

Jane Coffin Childs Memorial Fund for Medical Research

  • Sheila S Teves

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Karen Adelman, Harvard Medical School, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: October 11, 2016
  2. Accepted: November 16, 2016
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: November 18, 2016 (version 1)
  4. Accepted Manuscript updated: November 21, 2016 (version 2)
  5. Accepted Manuscript updated: November 30, 2016 (version 3)
  6. Version of Record published: December 14, 2016 (version 4)
  7. Version of Record updated: December 16, 2016 (version 5)

Copyright

© 2016, Teves et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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