Oncometabolite D-2-Hydroxyglutarate enhances gene silencing through inhibition of specific H3K36 histone demethylases

  1. Ryan Janke
  2. Anthony Iavarone
  3. Jasper Rine  Is a corresponding author
  1. University of California, Berkeley, United States

Abstract

Certain mutations affecting central metabolism cause accumulation of the oncometabolite D-2-hydroxyglutarate which promotes progression of certain tumors. High levels of D-2-hydroxyglutarate inhibit the TET family of DNA demethylases and Jumonji family of histone demethylases and cause epigenetic changes that lead to altered gene expression. The link between inhibition of DNA demethylation and changes in expression is strong in some cancers, but not in others. To determine whether D-2-hydroxyglutarate can affect gene expression through inhibiting histone demethylases, orthologous mutations to those known to cause accumulation of D-2-hydroxyglutarate in tumors were generated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which has histone demethylases but not DNA methylases or demethylases. Accumulation of D-2-hydroxyglutarate caused inhibition of several histone demethylases. Inhibition of two of the demethylases that act specifically on histone H3K36me2,3 led to enhanced gene silencing. These observations pinpointed a new mechanism by which this oncometabolite can alter gene expression, perhaps repressing critical inhibitors of proliferation.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Ryan Janke

    Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-5755-8019
  2. Anthony Iavarone

    California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Jasper Rine

    Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, United States
    For correspondence
    jrine@berkeley.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-2297-9814

Funding

National Institutes of Health (F32 Postdoctoral Fellowship,GM115074)

  • Ryan Janke

National Institutes of Health (1S10OD020062-01)

  • Anthony Iavarone

National Institutes of Health (GM31105)

  • Jasper Rine

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Alan G Hinnebusch, National Institutes of Health, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: October 17, 2016
  2. Accepted: March 17, 2017
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: March 27, 2017 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: April 11, 2017 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2017, Janke et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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  1. Ryan Janke
  2. Anthony Iavarone
  3. Jasper Rine
(2017)
Oncometabolite D-2-Hydroxyglutarate enhances gene silencing through inhibition of specific H3K36 histone demethylases
eLife 6:e22451.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22451

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