Longevity is impacted by growth hormone action during early postnatal period

  1. Liou Y Sun  Is a corresponding author
  2. Yimin Fang
  3. Amit Patki
  4. Jacob JE Koopman
  5. David B Allison
  6. Cristal Hill
  7. Michal M Masternak
  8. Justin Darcy
  9. Jian Wang
  10. Samuel McFadden
  11. Andrzej Bartke
  1. University of Alabama at Birmingham, United States
  2. Southern Illinois University, School of Medicine, United States
  3. Leiden University Medical Center, Netherlands
  4. College of Medicine, University of Central Florida, United States

Abstract

Life-long lack of growth hormone (GH) action can produce remarkable extension of longevity in mice. Here we report that GH treatment limited to a few weeks during development influences the lifespan of long-lived Ames dwarf and normal littermate control mice in a genotype and sex-specific manner. Studies in a separate cohort of Ames dwarf mice show that this short period of the GH exposure during early development produces persistent phenotypic, metabolic and molecular changes that are evident in late adult life. These effects may represent mechanisms responsible for reduced longevity of dwarf mice exposed to GH treatment early in life. Our data suggest that developmental programming of aging importantly contributes to (and perhaps explains) the well documented developmental origins of adult disease.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Liou Y Sun

    Department of Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, United States
    For correspondence
    leeosun@gmail.com
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-9802-6780
  2. Yimin Fang

    Department of Internal Medicine, Southern Illinois University, School of Medicine, Springfield, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Amit Patki

    Department of Biostatistics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Jacob JE Koopman

    Section of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Department of Internal Medicine, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. David B Allison

    Department of Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Brimingham, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Cristal Hill

    Department of Internal Medicine, Southern Illinois University, School of Medicine, Springfield, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  7. Michal M Masternak

    Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Central Florida, Orlando, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  8. Justin Darcy

    Department of Internal Medicine, Southern Illinois University, School of Medicine, Springfield, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  9. Jian Wang

    Department of Biology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  10. Samuel McFadden

    Department of Internal Medicine, Southern Illinois University, School of Medicine, Springfield, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  11. Andrzej Bartke

    Department of Internal Medicine, Southern Illinois University, School of Medicine, Springfield, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Funding

National Institute on Aging

  • Liou Y Sun

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • David B Allison

National Insitute on Aging

  • Andrzej Bartke

National Insitute on Aging

  • David B Allison

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Ethics

Animal experimentation: This study was performed in strict accordance with the recommendations in the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals of the National Institutes of Health. All of the animals were handled according to approved institutional animal care and use committee (IACUC) protocols (IACUC-20292) of the University of Alabama and (#178-020-001) of SIU school of medicine. The protocol was approved by the Committee on the Ethics of Animal Experiments of the UAB and SIUSOM.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Andrew Dillin, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California, Berkeley, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: December 8, 2016
  2. Accepted: June 19, 2017
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: July 4, 2017 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: July 18, 2017 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2017, Sun et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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  1. Liou Y Sun
  2. Yimin Fang
  3. Amit Patki
  4. Jacob JE Koopman
  5. David B Allison
  6. Cristal Hill
  7. Michal M Masternak
  8. Justin Darcy
  9. Jian Wang
  10. Samuel McFadden
  11. Andrzej Bartke
(2017)
Longevity is impacted by growth hormone action during early postnatal period
eLife 6:e24059.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24059
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