1. Ecology
  2. Microbiology and Infectious Disease
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A diverse host thrombospondin-type-1 repeat protein repertoire promotes symbiont colonization during establishment of cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis

  1. Emilie-Fleur Neubaeur
  2. Angela Z Poole
  3. Philipp Neubauer
  4. Olivier Detournay
  5. Kenneth Tan
  6. Simon K Davy  Is a corresponding author
  7. Virginia M Weis  Is a corresponding author
  1. Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
  2. Western Oregon University, United States
  3. Dragonfly Data Science, New Zealand
  4. Planktovie sas, France
  5. Oregon State University, United States
Research Article
  • Cited 14
  • Views 1,297
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Cite this article as: eLife 2017;6:e24494 doi: 10.7554/eLife.24494

Abstract

The mutualistic endosymbiosis between cnidarians and dinoflagellates is mediated by complex inter-partner signaling events, where the host cnidarian innate immune system plays a crucial role in recognition and regulation of symbionts. To date, little is known about the diversity of thrombospondin-type-1 repeat (TSR) domain proteins in basal metazoans and or their potential role in regulation of cnidarian-dinoflagellate mutualisms. We reveal a large and diverse repertoire of TSR proteins in seven anthozoan species, and show that in the model sea anemone Aiptasia pallida the TSR domain promotes colonization of the host by the symbiotic dinoflagellate Symbiodinium minutum. Blocking TSR domains led to decreased colonization success, while adding exogenous TSRs resulted in a 'super colonization'. Furthermore, gene expression of TSR proteins was highest at early time-points during symbiosis establishment. Our work characterizes the diversity of cnidarian TSR proteins and provides evidence that these proteins play an important role in the establishment of cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbiosis.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Emilie-Fleur Neubaeur

    School of Biological Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Angela Z Poole

    Department of Biology, Western Oregon University, Monmouth, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Philipp Neubauer

    Dragonfly Data Science, Wellington, New Zealand
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-4150-848X
  4. Olivier Detournay

    Planktovie sas, Allauch, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Kenneth Tan

    Department of Integrative Biology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Simon K Davy

    School of Biological Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand
    For correspondence
    Simon.Davy@vuw.ac.nz
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  7. Virginia M Weis

    Department of Integrative Biology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, United States
    For correspondence
    weisv@oregonstate.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-1826-2848

Funding

National Science Foundation (IOB0919073)

  • Virginia M Weis

Victoria University of Wellington

  • Emilie-Fleur Neubaeur

Oregon State University

  • Kenneth Tan

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Paul G Falkowski, Rutgers University, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: December 21, 2016
  2. Accepted: April 29, 2017
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: May 8, 2017 (version 1)
  4. Accepted Manuscript updated: May 9, 2017 (version 2)
  5. Version of Record published: May 26, 2017 (version 3)

Copyright

© 2017, Neubaeur et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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