1. Cell Biology
  2. Developmental Biology
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Dual role for Jumu in the control of hematopoietic progenitors in the Drosophila lymph gland

  1. Yangguang Hao
  2. Li Hua Jin  Is a corresponding author
  1. Northeast Forestry University, China
Research Article
  • Cited 18
  • Views 1,326
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Cite this article as: eLife 2017;6:e25094 doi: 10.7554/eLife.25094

Abstract

The Drosophila lymph gland is a hematopoietic organ in which the maintenance of hematopoietic progenitor cell fate relies on intrinsic factors and extensive interaction with cells within a microenvironment. The posterior signaling center (PSC) is required for maintaining the balance between progenitors and their differentiation into mature hemocytes. Moreover, some factors from the progenitors cell-autonomously control blood cell differentiation. Here, we show that Jumeau (Jumu), a member of the forkhead (Fkh) transcription factor family, controls hemocyte differentiation of lymph gland through multiple regulatory mechanisms. Jumu maintains the proper differentiation of prohemocytes by cell-autonomously regulating the expression of Col in medullary zone and by non-cell-autonomously preventing the generation of expanded PSC cells. Jumu can also cell-autonomously control the proliferation of PSC cells through positive regulation of dMyc expression. We also show that a deficiency of jumu throughout the lymph gland can induce the differentiation of lamellocytes via activating Toll signaling.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Yangguang Hao

    Department of Genetics, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin, China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Li Hua Jin

    Department of Genetics, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin, China
    For correspondence
    lhjin2000@hotmail.com
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-5912-9800

Funding

National Natural Science Foundation of China (General Program 31270923)

  • Li Hua Jin

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Utpal Banerjee, University of California, Los Angeles, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: January 13, 2017
  2. Accepted: March 20, 2017
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: March 28, 2017 (version 1)
  4. Accepted Manuscript updated: April 3, 2017 (version 2)
  5. Version of Record published: April 13, 2017 (version 3)

Copyright

© 2017, Hao & Jin

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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