1. Neuroscience
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Arid1b haploinsufficient mice reveal neuropsychiatric phenotypes and reversible causes of growth impairment

  1. Cemre Celen
  2. Jen-Chieh Chuang
  3. Xin Luo
  4. Nadine Nijem
  5. Angela K Walker
  6. Fei Chen
  7. Shuyuan Zhang
  8. Andrew Seungjae Chung
  9. Liem H Nguyen
  10. Ibrahim Nassour
  11. Albert Budhipramono
  12. Xuxu Sun
  13. Levinus A Bok
  14. Meriel McEntagart
  15. Evelien Gevers
  16. Shari G Birnbaum
  17. Amelia J Eisch
  18. Craig M Powell
  19. Woo-Ping Ge
  20. Gijs WE Santen
  21. Maria Chahrour
  22. Hao Zhu  Is a corresponding author
  1. UT Southwestern Medical Center, United States
  2. University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, United States
  3. Máxima Medical Center, Netherlands
  4. St George's University Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust, United Kingdom
  5. Queen Mary University of London, United Kingdom
  6. University of Pennsylvania, United States
  7. Leiden University Medical Center, Netherlands
Research Article
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Cite this article as: eLife 2017;6:e25730 doi: 10.7554/eLife.25730

Abstract

Sequencing studies have implicated haploinsufficiency of ARID1B, a SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling subunit, in short stature (1), autism spectrum disorder (2), intellectual disability (3), and corpus callosum agenesis (4). In addition, ARID1B is the most common cause of Coffin-Siris Syndrome, a developmental delay syndrome characterized by some of the above abnormalities (5-7). We generated Arid1b heterozygous mice, which showed social behavior impairment, altered vocalization, anxiety-like behavior, neuroanatomical abnormalities, and growth impairment. In the brain, Arid1b haploinsufficiency resulted in changes in the expression of SWI/SNF-regulated genes implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders. A focus on reversible mechanisms identified insulin-like growth factor (IGF1) deficiency with inadequate compensation by Growth Hormone Releasing Hormone (GHRH) and Growth Hormone (GH), underappreciated findings in ARID1B patients. Therapeutically, GH supplementation was able to correct growth retardation and muscle weakness. This model functionally validates the involvement of ARID1B in human disorders, and allows mechanistic dissection of neurodevelopmental diseases linked to chromatin-remodeling.

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The following previously published data sets were used

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Cemre Celen

    The Children's Medical Center Research Institute, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Jen-Chieh Chuang

    Children's Research Institute, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Xin Luo

    Children's Research Institute, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Nadine Nijem

    Department of Neuroscience, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Angela K Walker

    Department of Neurology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Fei Chen

    Children's Research Institute, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  7. Shuyuan Zhang

    Children's Research Institute, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  8. Andrew Seungjae Chung

    Children's Research Institute, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  9. Liem H Nguyen

    Children's Research Institute, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  10. Ibrahim Nassour

    Children's Research Institute, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  11. Albert Budhipramono

    Children's Research Institute, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  12. Xuxu Sun

    Children's Research Institute, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  13. Levinus A Bok

    Department of Pediatrics, Máxima Medical Center, Veldhoven, Netherlands
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  14. Meriel McEntagart

    Medical Genetics, St George's University Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  15. Evelien Gevers

    William Harvey Research Institute, Barts and the London, Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  16. Shari G Birnbaum

    Department of Psychiatry, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  17. Amelia J Eisch

    Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  18. Craig M Powell

    Department of Neurology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  19. Woo-Ping Ge

    Children's Research Institute, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  20. Gijs WE Santen

    Department of Clinical Genetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  21. Maria Chahrour

    Department of Neuroscience, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  22. Hao Zhu

    Children's Research Institute, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States
    For correspondence
    Hao.Zhu@utsouthwestern.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-8417-9698

Funding

Hamon Center for Regenerative Science and Medicine

  • Cemre Celen
  • Xuxu Sun

National Institutes of Health (DA023555)

  • Amelia J Eisch

National Institutes of Health (MH107945)

  • Amelia J Eisch

Postdoctoral Institutional training grant (NIDA T32-DA007290)

  • Angela K Walker

HHMI International Fellowship

  • Liem H Nguyen

Pollack Foundation

  • Hao Zhu

National Institutes of Health (1K08CA157727)

  • Hao Zhu

National Cancer Institute (1R01CA190525)

  • Hao Zhu

Burroughs Wellcome Fund

  • Hao Zhu

CPRIT New Investigator Award (R1209)

  • Hao Zhu

CPRIT Early Translation Grant (DP150077)

  • Hao Zhu

National Institutes of Health (DA023701)

  • Amelia J Eisch

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Ethics

Animal experimentation: Revised ethics statement: All animal procedures were based on animal care guidelines approved by the Institutional. Animal Care and Use Committee at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center (UTSW). Animal protocol number is 2015-101118. Patient data included in the article is non-identifiable data, and hence does not require approval from the patient/parents.

Human subjects: All animal procedures were based on animal care guidelines approved by the Institutional. Animal Care and Use Committee at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center (UTSW). Animal protocol number is 2015-101118. Patient data included in the article is non-identifiable data, and hence does not require approval from the patients.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Joseph G Gleeson, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Rockefeller University, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: February 3, 2017
  2. Accepted: June 24, 2017
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: July 11, 2017 (version 1)
  4. Accepted Manuscript updated: July 13, 2017 (version 2)
  5. Version of Record published: July 18, 2017 (version 3)

Copyright

© 2017, Celen et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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Further reading

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    Although fear memory formation is essential for survival and fear-related mental disorders, the neural circuitry and mechanism are incompletely understood. Here, we utilized trace fear conditioning to study the formation of trace fear memory in mice. We identified the entorhinal cortex (EC) as a critical component of sensory signaling to the amygdala. We adopted both loss-of-function and gain-of-function experiments to demonstrate that release of the cholecystokinin (CCK) from the EC is required for trace fear memory formation. We discovered that CCK-positive neurons project from the EC to the lateral nuclei of the amygdala (LA), and inhibition of CCK-dependent signaling in the EC prevented long-term potentiation of the auditory response in the LA and formation of trace fear memory. In summary, high-frequency activation of EC neurons triggers the release of CCK in their projection terminals in the LA, potentiating auditory response in LA neurons. The neural plasticity in the LA leads to trace fear memory formation.

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    Neocortical sensory areas have associated primary and secondary thalamic nuclei. While primary nuclei transmit sensory information to cortex, secondary nuclei remain poorly understood. We recorded juxtasomally from secondary somatosensory (POm) and visual (LP) nuclei of awake mice while tracking whisking and pupil size. POm activity correlated with whisking, but not precise whisker kinematics. This coarse movement modulation persisted after facial paralysis and thus was not due to sensory reafference. This phenomenon also continued during optogenetic silencing of somatosensory and motor cortex and after lesion of superior colliculus, ruling out a motor efference copy mechanism. Whisking and pupil dilation were strongly correlated, possibly reflecting arousal. Indeed LP, which is not part of the whisker system, tracked whisking equally well, further indicating that POm activity does not encode whisker movement per se. The semblance of movement-related activity is likely instead a global effect of arousal on both nuclei. We conclude that secondary thalamus monitors behavioral state, rather than movement, and may exist to alter cortical activity accordingly.