Heat stress promotes longevity in budding yeast by relaxing the confinement of age-promoting factors in the mother cell

  1. Sandro Baldi
  2. Alessio Bolognesi
  3. Anne Cornelis Meinema
  4. Yves Barral  Is a corresponding author
  1. Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Germany
  2. Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich, Switzerland

Abstract

Although individuals of many species inexorably age, a number of observations established that the rate of ageing is modulated in response to a variety of mild stresses. Here, we investigated how heat stress promotes longevity in yeast. We show that upon growth at higher temperature, yeast cells relax the retention of DNA circles, which act as ageing factors in the mother cell. The enhanced frequency at which circles redistribute to daughter cells was not due to changes of anaphase duration or nuclear shape but solely to the downregulation of the diffusion barrier in the nuclear envelope. This effect depended on the PKA and Tor1 pathways, downstream of stress-response kinase Pkc1. Inhibition of these responses restored barrier function and circle retention and abrogated the effect of heat stress on longevity. Our data indicate that redistribution of ageing factors from aged cells to their progeny can be a mechanism for modulating longevity.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Sandro Baldi

    Biomedical Center Munich, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Alessio Bolognesi

    Institute of Biochemistry, Department of Biology, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-7268-4577
  3. Anne Cornelis Meinema

    Institute of Biochemistry, Department of Biology, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Yves Barral

    Institute of Biochemistry, Department of Biology, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland
    For correspondence
    yves.barral@bc.biol.ethz.ch
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-0989-3373

Funding

Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich

  • Yves Barral

H2020 European Research Council

  • Yves Barral

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Naama Barkai, Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel

Publication history

  1. Received: May 3, 2017
  2. Accepted: December 27, 2017
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: December 28, 2017 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: January 17, 2018 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2017, Baldi et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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  1. Sandro Baldi
  2. Alessio Bolognesi
  3. Anne Cornelis Meinema
  4. Yves Barral
(2017)
Heat stress promotes longevity in budding yeast by relaxing the confinement of age-promoting factors in the mother cell
eLife 6:e28329.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.28329

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