Two receptor tyrosine phosphatases dictate the depth of axonal stabilizing layer in the visual system

  1. Satoko Hakeda-Suzuki  Is a corresponding author
  2. Hiroki Takechi
  3. Hinata Kawamura
  4. Takashi Suzuki  Is a corresponding author
  1. Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan

Abstract

Formation of a functional neuronal network requires not only precise target recognition, but also stabilization of axonal contacts within their appropriate synaptic layers. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the stabilization of axonal connections after reaching their specifically targeted layers. Here, we show that two receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs), LAR and Ptp69D, act redundantly in photoreceptor afferents to stabilize axonal connections to the specific layers of the Drosophila visual system. Surprisingly, by combining loss-of-function and genetic rescue experiments, we found that the depth of the final layer of stable termination relied primarily on the cumulative amount of LAR and Ptp69D cytoplasmic activity, while specific features of their ectodomains contribute to the choice between two synaptic layers, M3 and M6, in the medulla. These data demonstrate how the combination of overlapping downstream but diversified upstream properties of two RPTPs can shape layer specific wiring.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Satoko Hakeda-Suzuki

    School of Life Science and Technology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Japan
    For correspondence
    hakeda@bio.titech.ac.jp
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Hiroki Takechi

    School of Life Science and Technology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Japan
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Hinata Kawamura

    School of Life Science and Technology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Japan
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Takashi Suzuki

    School of Life Science and Technology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Japan
    For correspondence
    suzukit@gmail.com
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-9093-2562

Funding

Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (Grant-in-Aid for JSPS Research Fellow)

  • Satoko Hakeda-Suzuki

Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (KAKENHI 26440119)

  • Satoko Hakeda-Suzuki

Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (KAKENHI 26291047)

  • Takashi Suzuki

Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (Grant-in Scientific Research on Innovation Areas 16H06457)

  • Takashi Suzuki

Toray Industries

  • Takashi Suzuki

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Carol A Mason, Columbia University, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: September 7, 2017
  2. Accepted: November 3, 2017
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: November 8, 2017 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: November 13, 2017 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2017, Hakeda-Suzuki et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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  1. Satoko Hakeda-Suzuki
  2. Hiroki Takechi
  3. Hinata Kawamura
  4. Takashi Suzuki
(2017)
Two receptor tyrosine phosphatases dictate the depth of axonal stabilizing layer in the visual system
eLife 6:e31812.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.31812

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