1. Chromosomes and Gene Expression
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General decapping activators target different subsets of inefficiently translated mRNAs

  1. Feng He  Is a corresponding author
  2. Alper Celik
  3. Chan Wu
  4. Allan Jacobson  Is a corresponding author
  1. University of Massachusetts Medical School, United States
Research Article
  • Cited 14
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Cite this article as: eLife 2018;7:e34409 doi: 10.7554/eLife.34409

Abstract

The Dcp1-Dcp2 decapping enzyme and the decapping activators Pat1, Dhh1, and Lsm1 regulate mRNA decapping, but their mechanistic integration is unknown. We analyzed the gene expression consequences of deleting PAT1, LSM1, or DHH1, or the DCP2 C-terminal domain, and found that: i) the Dcp2 C-terminal domain is an effector of both negative and positive regulation; ii) rather than being global activators of decapping, Pat1, Lsm1, and Dhh1 directly target specific subsets of yeast mRNAs and loss of the functions of each of these factors has substantial indirect consequences for genome-wide mRNA expression; and iii) transcripts targeted by Pat1, Lsm1, and Dhh1 exhibit only partial overlap, are generally translated inefficiently, and, as expected, are targeted to decapping-dependent decay. Our results define the roles of Pat1, Lsm1, and Dhh1 in decapping of general mRNAs and suggest that these factors may monitor mRNA translation and target unique features of individual mRNAs.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Feng He

    Department of Microbiology and Physiological Systems, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, United States
    For correspondence
    feng.he@umassmed.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Alper Celik

    Department of Microbiology and Physiological Systems, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Chan Wu

    Department of Microbiology and Physiological Systems, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Allan Jacobson

    Department of Microbiology and Physiological Systems, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, United States
    For correspondence
    Allan.Jacobson@umassmed.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-5661-3821

Funding

National Institutes of Health (5R01 GM27757-37)

  • Allan Jacobson

National Institutes of Health (1R35GM122468- 01)

  • Allan Jacobson

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Nahum Sonenberg, McGill University, Canada

Publication history

  1. Received: June 12, 2018
  2. Accepted: December 4, 2018
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: December 6, 2018 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: December 19, 2018 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2018, He et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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