1. Neuroscience
Download icon

Promoting subjective preferences in simple economic choices during nap

  1. Sizhi Ai
  2. Yunlu Yin
  3. Yu Chen
  4. Cong Wang
  5. Yan Sun
  6. Xiangdong Tang
  7. Lin Lu
  8. Lusha Zhu  Is a corresponding author
  9. Jie Shi  Is a corresponding author
  1. Peking University, China
  2. Sichuan University, China
Research Article
  • Cited 1
  • Views 2,028
  • Annotations
Cite this article as: eLife 2018;7:e40583 doi: 10.7554/eLife.40583

Abstract

Sleep is known to benefit consolidation of memories, especially those of motivational relevance. Yet it remains largely unknown the extent to which sleep influences reward-associated behavior, in particular, whether and how sleep modulates reward evaluation that critically underlies value-based decisions. Here, we show that neural processing during sleep can selectively bias preferences in simple economic choices when the sleeper is stimulated by covert, reward-associated cues. Specifically, presenting the spoken name of a familiar, valued snack item during midday nap significantly improves the preference for that item relative to items not externally cued. The cueing-specific preference enhancement is sleep-dependent and can be predicted by cue-induced neurophysiological signals at the subject and item level. Computational modeling further suggests that sleep cueing accelerates evidence accumulation for cued options during the post-sleep choice process in a manner consistent with the preference shift. These findings suggest that neurocognitive processing during sleep contributes to the fine-tuning of subjective preferences in a flexible, selective manner.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Sizhi Ai

    National Institute on Drug Dependence, Peking University, Beijing, China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Yunlu Yin

    IDG/McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Peking University, Beijing, China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Yu Chen

    National Institute on Drug Dependence, Peking University, Beijing, China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Cong Wang

    IDG/McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Peking University, Beijing, China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Yan Sun

    National Institute on Drug Dependence, Peking University, Beijing, China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Xiangdong Tang

    Sleep Medicine Center, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  7. Lin Lu

    National Institute on Drug Dependence, Peking University, Beijing, China
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  8. Lusha Zhu

    IDG/McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Peking University, Beijing, China
    For correspondence
    lushazhu@pku.edu.cn
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-8717-6356
  9. Jie Shi

    National Institute on Drug Dependence, Peking University, Beijing, China
    For correspondence
    shijie@bjmu.edu.cn
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-6567-8160

Funding

National Natural Science Foundation of China (31671171)

  • Lusha Zhu

National Natural Science Foundation of China (31630034)

  • Lusha Zhu

National Natural Science Foundation of China (31571099)

  • Jie Shi

National Basic Research Program of China (2015CB856404)

  • Jie Shi

National Basic Research Program of China (2015CB553503)

  • Jie Shi

National Natural Science Foundation of China (81801315)

  • Sizhi Ai

The funders had no role in study design, data collection, and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Ethics

Human subjects: All participants provided written informed consent. Study procedures were reviewed and approved by the Ethics Committee at Peking University.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Michael Breakspear, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Australia

Publication history

  1. Received: July 30, 2018
  2. Accepted: December 6, 2018
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: December 6, 2018 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: December 14, 2018 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2018, Ai et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

Metrics

  • 2,028
    Page views
  • 302
    Downloads
  • 1
    Citations

Article citation count generated by polling the highest count across the following sources: Crossref, PubMed Central, Scopus.

Download links

A two-part list of links to download the article, or parts of the article, in various formats.

Downloads (link to download the article as PDF)

Download citations (links to download the citations from this article in formats compatible with various reference manager tools)

Open citations (links to open the citations from this article in various online reference manager services)

Further reading

    1. Neuroscience
    Femke Maij et al.
    Research Article

    When humans indicate on which hand a tactile stimulus occurred, they often err when their hands are crossed. This finding seemingly supports the view that the automatically determined touch location in external space affects limb assignment: the crossed right hand is localized in left space, and this conflict presumably provokes hand assignment errors. Here, participants judged on which hand the first of two stimuli, presented during a bimanual movement, had occurred, and then indicated its external location by a reach-to-point movement. When participants incorrectly chose the hand stimulated second, they pointed to where that hand had been at the correct, first time point, though no stimulus had occurred at that location. This behavior suggests that stimulus localization depended on hand assignment, not vice versa. It is, thus, incompatible with the notion of automatic computation of external stimulus location upon occurrence. Instead, humans construct external touch location post-hoc and on demand.

    1. Neuroscience
    Enrico Schulz et al.
    Research Article Updated

    We investigated how the attenuation of pain with cognitive interventions affects brain connectivity using neuroimaging and a whole brain novel analysis approach. While receiving tonic cold pain, 20 healthy participants performed three different pain attenuation strategies during simultaneous collection of functional imaging data at seven tesla. Participants were asked to rate their pain after each trial. We related the trial-by-trial variability of the attenuation performance to the trial-by-trial functional connectivity strength change of brain data. Across all conditions, we found that a higher performance of pain attenuation was predominantly associated with higher functional connectivity. Of note, we observed an association between low pain and high connectivity for regions that belong to brain regions long associated with pain processing, the insular and cingulate cortices. For one of the cognitive strategies (safe place), the performance of pain attenuation was explained by diffusion tensor imaging metrics of increased white matter integrity.