1. Neuroscience
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Inter-individual differences in human brain structure and morphometry link to variation in demographics and behavior

  1. Alberto Llera  Is a corresponding author
  2. Thomas Wolfers
  3. Peter Mulders
  4. Christian F Beckmann
  1. Radboud University Nijmegen, Netherlands
Research Article
  • Cited 5
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Cite this article as: eLife 2019;8:e44443 doi: 10.7554/eLife.44443

Abstract

We perform a comprehensive integrative analysis of multiple structural MR-based brain features and find for the first-time strong evidence relating inter-individual brain structural variations to a wide range of demographic and behavioral variates across a large cohort of young healthy human volunteers. Our analyses reveal that a robust 'positive-negative' spectrum of behavioral and demographic variates, recently associated to covariation in brain function, can already be identified using only structural features, highlighting the importance of careful integration of structural features in any analysis of inter-individual differences in functional connectivity and downstream associations with behavioral/demographic variates.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Alberto Llera

    Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, Netherlands
    For correspondence
    a.llera@donders.ru.nl
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-8358-8625
  2. Thomas Wolfers

    Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, Netherlands
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Peter Mulders

    Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, Netherlands
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Christian F Beckmann

    Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, Netherlands
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Funding

Wellcome Trust UK Strategic Award (098369/Z/12/Z)

  • Christian F Beckmann

Nederlands Organization for Scientific Research (864.12.003)

  • Christian F Beckmann

Synergy Grant by the European Research Council under the European Union's Seventh Programme (ERC Grant Agreement no.319456)

  • Christian F Beckmann

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Ethics

Human subjects: HCP data were acquired using protocols approved by the Washington University institutional review board. Informed consent was obtained from subjects. Anonymised data are publicly available from ConnectomeDB (db.humanconnectome.org; Hodge et al., 2016). Certain parts of the dataset used in this study, such as the age of the subjects, are available subject to restricted data usage terms, requiring researchers to ensure that the anonymity of subjects is protected (Van Essen et al., 2013). Informed consent and consent to publish was obtained from the Human Connectome Project according to the declaration of Helsinki. Research conducted at the Donders Center for Cognitive Neuroimage is covered by the protocol approved by the 'Commissie Mensgebonden Onderzoek (CMO) Regio Arnhem-Nijmegen' registered under CMO number 2014/288.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Moritz Helmstaedter, Max Planck Institute for Brain Research, Germany

Publication history

  1. Received: December 15, 2018
  2. Accepted: July 2, 2019
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: July 3, 2019 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: July 29, 2019 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2019, Llera et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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