Transverse tubule remodeling enhances Orai1-dependent Ca2+ entry in skeletal muscle

  1. Antonio Michelucci
  2. Simona Boncompagni
  3. Laura Pietrangelo
  4. Maricela García-Castañeda
  5. Takahiro Takano
  6. Sundeep Malik
  7. Robert T Dirksen  Is a corresponding author
  8. Feliciano Protasi
  1. University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, United States
  2. University G d' Annunzio of Chieti, Italy

Abstract

Exercise promotes the formation of intracellular junctions in skeletal muscle between stacks of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) cisternae and extensions of transverse-tubules (TT) that increase co-localization of proteins required for store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE). Here we report that SOCE, peak Ca2+ transient amplitude and muscle force production during repetitive stimulation are increased after exercise in parallel with the time course of TT association with SR-stacks. Unexpectedly, exercise also activated constitutive Ca2+ entry coincident with a modest decrease in total releasable Ca2+ store content. Importantly, this decrease in releasable Ca2+ store content observed after exercise was reversed by repetitive high-frequency stimulation, consistent with enhanced SOCE. The functional benefits of exercise on SOCE, constitutive Ca2+ entry and muscle force production were lost in mice with muscle-specific loss of Orai1 function. These results indicate that TT association with SR-stacks enhances Orai1-dependent SOCE to optimize Ca2+ dynamics and muscle contractile function during acute exercise.

Data availability

All data generated or analysed during this study are included in the manuscript and supporting files.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Antonio Michelucci

    Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Simona Boncompagni

    CeSI-MeT, Center for Research on Ageing and Translational Medicine, University G d' Annunzio of Chieti, Chieti, Italy
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-5308-5069
  3. Laura Pietrangelo

    CeSI-MeT, Center for Research on Ageing and Translational Medicine, University G d' Annunzio of Chieti, Chieti, Italy
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Maricela García-Castañeda

    Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Takahiro Takano

    Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Sundeep Malik

    Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  7. Robert T Dirksen

    Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, United States
    For correspondence
    robert_dirksen@urmc.rochester.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-3182-1755
  8. Feliciano Protasi

    CeSI-MeT, Center for Research on Ageing and Translational Medicine, University G d' Annunzio of Chieti, Chieti, Italy
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Funding

National Institutes of Health (AR059646)

  • Robert T Dirksen
  • Feliciano Protasi

Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research (PRIN #2015ZZR4W3)

  • Feliciano Protasi

Alfred and Eleanor Wedd Fund

  • Antonio Michelucci

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Ethics

Animal experimentation: All animal studies were designed to minimize animal suffering and were approved by the local University Committee on Animal Resources and Animal Ethical Committees at the University of Chieti and the University of Rochester, respectively.(UCAR-2006-114E).

Reviewing Editor

  1. Richard S Lewis, Stanford University School of Medicine, United States

Version history

  1. Received: April 10, 2019
  2. Accepted: October 24, 2019
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: October 28, 2019 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: November 7, 2019 (version 2)
  5. Version of Record updated: November 18, 2019 (version 3)

Copyright

© 2019, Michelucci et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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  1. Antonio Michelucci
  2. Simona Boncompagni
  3. Laura Pietrangelo
  4. Maricela García-Castañeda
  5. Takahiro Takano
  6. Sundeep Malik
  7. Robert T Dirksen
  8. Feliciano Protasi
(2019)
Transverse tubule remodeling enhances Orai1-dependent Ca2+ entry in skeletal muscle
eLife 8:e47576.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.47576

Share this article

https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.47576

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