1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
  2. Cell Biology
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A potent voltage-gated calcium channel inhibitor engineered from a nanobody targeted to auxiliary CaVβ subunits

  1. Travis Morgenstern
  2. Jinseo Park
  3. Qing R Fan
  4. Henry M Colecraft  Is a corresponding author
  1. Columbia University, United States
Research Article
  • Cited 6
  • Views 2,313
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Cite this article as: eLife 2019;8:e49253 doi: 10.7554/eLife.49253

Abstract

Inhibiting high-voltage-activated calcium channels (HVACCs; CaV1/CaV2) is therapeutic for myriad cardiovascular and neurological diseases. For particular applications, genetically-encoded HVACC blockers may enable channel inhibition with greater tissue-specificity and versatility than is achievable with small molecules. Here, we engineered a genetically-encoded HVACC inhibitor by first isolating an immunized llama nanobody (nb.F3) that binds auxiliary HVACC CaVβ subunits. Nb.F3 by itself is functionally inert, providing a convenient vehicle to target active moieties to CaVβ-associated channels. Nb.F3 fused to the catalytic HECT domain of Nedd4L (CaV-aβlator), an E3 ubiquitin ligase, ablated currents from diverse HVACCs reconstituted in HEK293 cells, and from endogenous CaV1/CaV2 channels in mammalian cardiomyocytes, dorsal root ganglion neurons, and pancreatic β cells. In cardiomyocytes, CaV-aβlator redistributed CaV1.2 channels from dyads to Rab-7-positive late endosomes. This work introduces CaV-aβlator as a potent genetically-encoded HVACC inhibitor, and describes a general approach that can be broadly adapted to generate versatile modulators for macro-molecular membrane protein complexes.

Data availability

All data generated or analysed during this study are included in the manuscript and supporting files.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Travis Morgenstern

    Department of Pharmacology, Columbia University, New York, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-2634-8470
  2. Jinseo Park

    Department of Pharmacology, Columbia University, New York, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Qing R Fan

    Department of Pharmacology, Columbia University, New York, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-9330-0963
  4. Henry M Colecraft

    Department of Pharmacology, Columbia University, New York, United States
    For correspondence
    hc2405@cumc.columbia.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-2340-8899

Funding

National Institutes of Health (R01 HL142111)

  • Henry M Colecraft

National Institutes of Health (R01 GM107585)

  • Henry M Colecraft

National Institutes of Health (F31 DK118866)

  • Travis Morgenstern

National Institutes of Health (S10RR027050)

  • Travis Morgenstern
  • Jinseo Park
  • Qing R Fan
  • Henry M Colecraft

National Institutes of Health (P30 CA013696)

  • Travis Morgenstern
  • Jinseo Park
  • Qing R Fan
  • Henry M Colecraft

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Ethics

Animal experimentation: This study was performed in strict accordance with the recommendations in the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals of the National Institutes of Health. All of the animals were handled according to approved institutional animal care and use committee (IACUC) protocols (#A3007-01) of Columbia University. Primary cultures of adult guinea pig heart ventricular cells were prepared in accordance with the guidelines of Columbia University Animal Care and Use Committee protocols (AC-AAAS5410). All surgery was performed under isoflurane anesthesia, and every effort was made to minimize suffering.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Mark T Nelson, University of Vermont, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: June 12, 2019
  2. Accepted: August 10, 2019
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: August 12, 2019 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: August 20, 2019 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2019, Morgenstern et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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