Biochemistry and Chemical Biology

Biochemistry and Chemical Biology

eLife publishes research that gives new insights into biological molecules or uses chemical approaches to illuminate complex biological processes. Learn more about what we publish and sign up for the latest research.
Illustration by Davide Bonazzi

Latest articles

    1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 searches DNA via a ‘monkey bar’ mechanism

    Johannes Rudolph et al.
    By moving between DNA segments like a child swinging on monkey bars, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 explores possible DNA damage sites more effectively.
    1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
    2. Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics

    Insights into the key determinants of membrane protein topology enable the identification of new monotopic folds

    Sonya Entova et al.
    Key sequence motifs, defined using the first reported structure of a monotopic membrane protein with a reentrant helix, enable identification of new monotopic membrane protein families previously predicted as membrane spanning.
    1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
    2. Chromosomes and Gene Expression

    Defective RNA polymerase III is negatively regulated by the SUMO-Ubiquitin-Cdc48 pathway

    Zheng Wang et al.
    The SUMO-Ub-Cdc48 pathway is a novel regulatory mechanism of Pol III and a potential therapeutic target for Pol III-related human diseases.
    1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
    2. Computational and Systems Biology

    Coevolution-based inference of amino acid interactions underlying protein function

    Victor H Salinas, Rama Ranganathan
    A deep mutational coupling study demonstrates the ability of sequence coevolution methods to reveal the pattern of amino acid interactions underlying protein function.
    1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
    2. Chromosomes and Gene Expression

    VivosX, a disulfide crosslinking method to capture site-specific, protein-protein interactions in yeast and human cells

    Chitra Mohan et al.
    An in vivo disulfide crosslinking assay shows preferential disassembly of nucleosomes with two H2A.Z histones by transcription machinery in yeast and conjugation to one or two ubiquitin moieties in human cells.

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