Biochemistry and Chemical Biology

Biochemistry and Chemical Biology

eLife publishes research that gives new insights into biological molecules or uses chemical approaches to illuminate complex biological processes. Learn more about what we publish and sign up for the latest research.
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Latest articles

    1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology

    Myopalladin knockout mice develop cardiac dilation and show a maladaptive response to mechanical pressure overload

    Maria Carmela Filomena et al.
    Ablation of the sarcomeric protein myopalladin (MYPN), associated with human cardiomyopathies, results in dilated cardiomyopathy, which is severely aggravated by biomechanical stress, suggesting that skeletal myopathy patients carrying MYPN loss-of-function mutations may develop cardiomyopathy under conditions of cardiac stress.
    1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
    2. Chromosomes and Gene Expression

    Competitive binding of MatP and topoisomerase IV to the MukB hinge domain

    Gemma LM Fisher et al.
    Topoisomerase IV and the ter-binding protein MatP competitively bind the hinge domain of the Escherichia coli Structural Maintenance of Chromosomes complex, MukB, leading to spatiotemporal regulation of MukBEF-topoisomerase IV activity.
    1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
    2. Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics

    The cooperative binding of TDP-43 to GU-rich RNA repeats antagonizes TDP-43 aggregation

    Juan Carlos Rengifo-Gonzalez et al.
    The RNA-mediated higher order assembly of TDP-43, a protein associated with neurodegenerative diseases, preserves its solubility by reducing the risk of multivalent interactions between low complexity domains.
    1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
    2. Cell Biology

    Quantitative proteomics reveals the selectivity of ubiquitin-binding autophagy receptors in the turnover of damaged lysosomes by lysophagy

    Vinay V Eapen et al.
    A combination of spatial proteomic and autophagic flux approaches was used to reveal the landscape of turnover of damaged lysosomes, demonstrating a key role for the autophagy receptor TAX1BP1 and its associated kinase TBK1 in both HeLa cells and iNeurons.
    1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
    2. Ecology

    Fungi: Sex and self defense

    Milton T Drott
    The fungus Aspergillus nidulans produces secondary metabolites during sexual development to protect itself from predators.
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Senior editors

  1. Richard Aldrich
    Richard Aldrich
    The University of Texas at Austin, United States
  2. Nancy Carrasco
    Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, United States
  3. Philip Cole
    Harvard Medical School, United States
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