1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
  2. Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics
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Structural diversity of oligomeric β-propellers with different numbers of identical blades

  1. Evgenia Afanasieva
  2. Indronil Chaudhuri
  3. Jörg Martin
  4. Eva Hertle
  5. Astrid Ursinus
  6. Vikram Alva
  7. Marcus D Hartmann
  8. Andrei N Lupas  Is a corresponding author
  1. Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Germany
Research Article
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Cite this article as: eLife 2019;8:e49853 doi: 10.7554/eLife.49853

Abstract

β-Propellers arise through the amplification of a supersecondary structure element called a blade. This process produces toroids of between four and twelve repeats, which are almost always arranged sequentially in a single polypeptide chain. We found that new propellers evolve continuously by amplification from single blades. We therefore investigated whether such nascent propellers can fold as homo-oligomers before they have been fully amplified within a single chain. One- to six-bladed building blocks derived from two seven-bladed WD40 propellers yielded stable homo-oligomers with six to nine blades, depending on the size of the building block. High-resolution structures for tetramers of two blades, trimers of three blades, and dimers of four and five blades, respectively, show structurally diverse propellers and include a novel fold, highlighting the inherent flexibility of the WD40 blade. Our data support the hypothesis that subdomain-sized fragments can provide structural versatility in the evolution of new proteins.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Evgenia Afanasieva

    Department of Protein Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Tübingen, Germany
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  2. Indronil Chaudhuri

    Department of Protein Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Tübingen, Germany
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  3. Jörg Martin

    Department of Protein Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Tübingen, Germany
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  4. Eva Hertle

    Department of Protein Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Tübingen, Germany
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  5. Astrid Ursinus

    Department of Protein Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Tübingen, Germany
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  6. Vikram Alva

    Department of Protein Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Tübingen, Germany
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-1188-473X
  7. Marcus D Hartmann

    Department of Protein Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Tübingen, Germany
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-6937-5677
  8. Andrei N Lupas

    Department of Protein Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Tübingen, Germany
    For correspondence
    andrei.lupas@tuebingen.mpg.de
    Competing interests
    Andrei N Lupas, Reviewing editor, eLife.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-1959-4836

Funding

Max Planck Society

  • Andrei N Lupas

Volkswagen Foundation (Life Grant 94 810)

  • Andrei N Lupas

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. John Kuriyan, University of California, Berkeley, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: July 2, 2019
  2. Accepted: September 25, 2019
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: October 15, 2019 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: October 22, 2019 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2019, Afanasieva et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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