1. Microbiology and Infectious Disease
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Entry by multiple picornaviruses is dependent on a pathway that includes TNK2, WASL and NCK1

  1. Hongbing Jiang  Is a corresponding author
  2. Christian Leung
  3. Stephen Tahan
  4. David Wang  Is a corresponding author
  1. Washington University in St Louis, United States
Research Article
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Cite this article as: eLife 2019;8:e50276 doi: 10.7554/eLife.50276

Abstract

Comprehensive knowledge of the host factors required for picornavirus infection would facilitate antiviral development. Here we demonstrate roles for three human genes, TNK2, WASL, and NCK1, in infection by multiple picornaviruses. CRISPR deletion of TNK2, WASL or NCK1 reduced encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), poliovirus and enterovirus D68 infection, and chemical inhibitors of TNK2 and WASL decreased EMCV infection. Reduced EMCV lethality was observed in mice lacking TNK2. TNK2, WASL and NCK1 were important in early stages of the viral lifecycle, and genetic epistasis analysis demonstrated that the three genes function in a common pathway. Mechanistically, reduced internalization of EMCV was observed in TNK2 deficient cells demonstrating that TNK2 functions in EMCV entry. Domain analysis of WASL demonstrated that its actin nucleation activity was necessary to facilitate viral infection. Together, these data support a model wherein TNK2, WASL, and NCK1 comprise a pathway important for multiple picornaviruses.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Hongbing Jiang

    Department of Molecular Microbiology, Pathology and Immunology, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, United States
    For correspondence
    hongbingjiang@wustl.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Christian Leung

    Department of Molecular Microbiology, Pathology and Immunology, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Stephen Tahan

    Department of Molecular Microbiology, Pathology and Immunology, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. David Wang

    Department of Molecular Microbiology, Pathology and Immunology, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, United States
    For correspondence
    davewang@wustl.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-0827-196X

Funding

National Institutes of Health (R01 AI134967)

  • David Wang

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Ethics

Animal experimentation: Animal experiments were conducted under the supervision of Department of Comparative Medicine at Washington University in St. Louis. All animal protocols were approved by the Washington University Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (Protocol #20170194 and #20180289).

Reviewing Editor

  1. Sara L Sawyer, University of Colorado Boulder, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: July 17, 2019
  2. Accepted: November 25, 2019
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: November 26, 2019 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: December 10, 2019 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2019, Jiang et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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