1. Cell Biology
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β3-Adrenoceptor redistribution impairs NO/cGMP/PDE2 signalling in failing cardiomyocytes

  1. Sophie Schobesberger
  2. Peter T Wright
  3. Claire Poulet
  4. Jose L Sanchez Alonso Mardones
  5. Catherine Mansfield
  6. Andreas Friebe
  7. Sian E Harding
  8. Jean-Luc Balligand
  9. Viacheslav O Nikolaev  Is a corresponding author
  10. Julia Gorelik  Is a corresponding author
  1. Imperial College London, United Kingdom
  2. University of Würzburg, Germany
  3. Université Catholique de Louvain, Belgium
  4. Universitätsklinikum Hamburg Eppendorf, Germany
Research Article
  • Cited 4
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Cite this article as: eLife 2020;9:e52221 doi: 10.7554/eLife.52221

Abstract

Cardiomyocyte b3-adrenoceptors (b3-ARs) coupled to soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)-dependent production of the second messenger 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) have been shown to protect from heart failure. However, the exact localization of these receptors to fine membrane structures and subcellular compartmentation of b3-AR/cGMP signals underpinning this protection in health and disease remain elusive. Here, we used a Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET)-based cGMP biosensor combined with scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) to show that functional β3-ARs are mostly confined to the T-tubules of healthy rat cardiomyocytes. Heart failure, induced via myocardial infarction, causes a decrease of the cGMP levels generated by these receptors and a change of subcellular cGMP compartmentation. Furthermore, attenuated cGMP signals led to impaired phosphodiesterase 2 dependent negative cGMP-to-cAMP cross-talk. In conclusion, topographic and functional reorganization of the b3-AR/cGMP signalosome happens in heart failure and should be considered when designing new therapies acting via this receptor.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Sophie Schobesberger

    Myocardial Function, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-8268-0019
  2. Peter T Wright

    Myocardial Function, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Claire Poulet

    Myocardial Function, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Jose L Sanchez Alonso Mardones

    Myocardial Function, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Catherine Mansfield

    Myocardial Function, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Andreas Friebe

    Physiologisches Institut, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  7. Sian E Harding

    Myocardial Function, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  8. Jean-Luc Balligand

    FATH Pole, Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain, Belgium
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  9. Viacheslav O Nikolaev

    Experimentelle Herz Kreislaufforschung, Universitätsklinikum Hamburg Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany
    For correspondence
    v.nikolaev@uke.de
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  10. Julia Gorelik

    National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom
    For correspondence
    j.gorelik@imperial.ac.uk
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-1148-9158

Funding

British Heart Foundation (12/18/30088)

  • Julia Gorelik

Wellcome (WT090594)

  • Julia Gorelik

Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Fr 1725/3-2)

  • Andreas Friebe
  • Viacheslav O Nikolaev

National Institutes of Health (ROI-HL grant 126802)

  • Julia Gorelik

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Ethics

Animal experimentation: All procedures performed in the UK were carried out according to the standards for the care and use of animal subjects determined by the UK Home Office (ASPA1986 Amendments Regulations 2012) incorporating the EU directive 2010/63/EU. The Animal Welfare and Ethical Review Body Committee of Imperial College London approved all protocols.The parts of the investigation, which were performed in Germany, conformed to the guide for the care and use of laboratory animals published by the National Institutes of Health (Bethesda, Maryland; Publication No. 85-23, revised 2011, published by National Research Council, Washington, D.C.). The experimental procedures were in accordance with the German Law for the Protection of Animals and with the guidelines of the European Community.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Nir Ben-Tal, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Publication history

  1. Received: October 4, 2019
  2. Accepted: March 25, 2020
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: March 31, 2020 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: April 7, 2020 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2020, Schobesberger et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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