Network dynamics underlying OFF responses in the auditory cortex

  1. Giulio Bondanelli
  2. Thomas Deneux
  3. Brice Bathellier
  4. Srdjan Ostojic  Is a corresponding author
  1. Ecole Normale Superieure Paris, France
  2. CNRS, France

Abstract

Across sensory systems, complex spatio-temporal patterns of neural activity arise following the onset (ON) and offset (OFF) of stimuli. While ON responses have been widely studied, the mechanisms generating OFF responses in cortical areas have so far not been fully elucidated. We examine here the hypothesis that OFF responses are single-cell signatures of recurrent interactions at the network level. To test this hypothesis, we performed population analyses of two-photon calcium recordings in the auditory cortex of awake mice listening to auditory stimuli, and compared linear single-cell and network models. While the single-cell model explained some prominent features of the data, it could not capture the structure across stimuli and trials. In contrast, the network model accounted for the low-dimensional organisation of population responses and their global structure across stimuli, where distinct stimuli activated mostly orthogonal dimensions in the neural state-space.

Data availability

Python code and data are available at https://github.com/gbondanelli/OffResponses

The following previously published data sets were used

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Giulio Bondanelli

    Laboratoire de Neurosciences Cognitives et Computationelles, Ecole Normale Superieure Paris, Paris, France
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  2. Thomas Deneux

    Paris-Saclay Institute of Neuroscience, CNRS, Gif sur Yvette, France
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-9330-7655
  3. Brice Bathellier

    Paris-Saclay Institute of Neuroscience, CNRS, Gif sur Yvette, France
    Competing interests
    Brice Bathellier, Reviewing editor, eLife.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-9211-1960
  4. Srdjan Ostojic

    Laboratoire de Neurosciences Cognitives et Computationelles, Ecole Normale Superieure Paris, Paris, France
    For correspondence
    srdjan.ostojic@ens.fr
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-7473-1223

Funding

Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR-16-CE37-0016)

  • Giulio Bondanelli
  • Srdjan Ostojic

Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR-17-EURE-0017)

  • Giulio Bondanelli
  • Srdjan Ostojic

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Peter Latham, University College London, United Kingdom

Version history

  1. Received: October 30, 2019
  2. Accepted: March 19, 2021
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: March 24, 2021 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: April 20, 2021 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2021, Bondanelli et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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  1. Giulio Bondanelli
  2. Thomas Deneux
  3. Brice Bathellier
  4. Srdjan Ostojic
(2021)
Network dynamics underlying OFF responses in the auditory cortex
eLife 10:e53151.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.53151

Share this article

https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.53151

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