Srsf10 and the minor spliceosome control tissue-specific and dynamic SR protein expression

  1. Stefan Meinke
  2. Gesine Goldammer
  3. A Ioana Weber
  4. Victor Tarabykin
  5. Alexander Neumann
  6. Marco Preussner  Is a corresponding author
  7. Florian Heyd  Is a corresponding author
  1. FU Berlin, Germany
  2. Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany

Abstract

Minor and major spliceosomes control splicing of distinct intron types and are thought to act largely independent of one another. SR proteins are essential splicing regulators mostly connected to the major spliceosome. Here, we show that Srsf10 expression is controlled through an autoregulated minor intron, tightly correlating Srsf10 with minor spliceosome abundance across different tissues and differentiation stages in mammals. Surprisingly, all other SR proteins also correlate with the minor spliceosome and Srsf10, and abolishing Srsf10 autoregulation by Crispr/Cas9-mediated deletion of the autoregulatory exon induces expression of all SR proteins in a human cell line. Our data thus reveal extensive crosstalk and a global impact of the minor spliceosome on major intron splicing.

Data availability

We have only used data that are publically available.

The following previously published data sets were used

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Stefan Meinke

    Institute of Chemistry and Biochemistry, FU Berlin, Berlin, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-5083-3383
  2. Gesine Goldammer

    Institute of Chemistry and Biochemistry, FU Berlin, Berlin, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. A Ioana Weber

    Institute of Chemistry and Biochemistry, FU Berlin, Berlin, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Victor Tarabykin

    Institute for Cell and Neurobiology, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Alexander Neumann

    Institute of Chemistry and Biochemistry, FU Berlin, Berlin, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Marco Preussner

    Institute of Chemistry and Biochemistry, FU Berlin, Berlin, Germany
    For correspondence
    mpreussner@zedat.fu-berlin.de
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  7. Florian Heyd

    Institute of Chemistry and Biochemistry, FU Berlin, Berlin, Germany
    For correspondence
    florian.heyd@fu-berlin.de
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-9377-9882

Funding

Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (278001972 - TRR 186)

  • Florian Heyd

Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (TA303/8-1)

  • Victor Tarabykin

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Ethics

Animal experimentation: Colonies of wild type mice of the NMRI strain were maintained in the animal facilities of Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin. Tissue collection was performed in compliance with German Animal Welfare Law and regulations imposed by the State Office for Health and Social Affairs Council in Berlin / Landesamt für Gesundheit und Soziales (LAGeSo) under licence T102/11.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Timothy W Nilsen, Case Western Reserve University, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: February 16, 2020
  2. Accepted: April 24, 2020
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: April 27, 2020 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: May 22, 2020 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2020, Meinke et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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  1. Stefan Meinke
  2. Gesine Goldammer
  3. A Ioana Weber
  4. Victor Tarabykin
  5. Alexander Neumann
  6. Marco Preussner
  7. Florian Heyd
(2020)
Srsf10 and the minor spliceosome control tissue-specific and dynamic SR protein expression
eLife 9:e56075.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.56075
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