Abstract

PKD2 (polycystin-2, TRPP1), a TRP polycystin channel, is expressed in endothelial cells (ECs), but its physiological functions in this cell type are unclear. Here, we generated inducible, EC-specific Pkd2 knockout mice to examine vascular functions of PKD2. Data show that a broad range of intravascular flow rates stimulate EC PKD2 channels, producing vasodilation. Flow-mediated PKD2 channel activation leads to calcium influx that activates SK/IK channels and eNOS serine 1176 phosphorylation in ECs. These signaling mechanisms produce arterial hyperpolarization and vasodilation. In contrast, EC PKD2 channels do not contribute to acetylcholine-induced vasodilation, suggesting stimulus-specific function. EC-specific PKD2 knockout elevated blood pressure in mice without altering cardiac function or kidney anatomy. These data demonstrate that flow stimulates PKD2 channels in ECs, leading to SK/IK channel and eNOS activation, hyperpolarization, vasodilation and a reduction in systemic blood pressure. Thus, PKD2 channels are a major component of functional flow sensing in the vasculature.

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All data generated or analysed during this study are included in the manuscript and supporting files.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Charles E MacKay

    Department of Physiology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. M Dennis Leo

    Department of Physiology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Carlos Fernández-Peña

    Department of Physiology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-0726-3204
  4. Raquibul Hasan

    Department of Physiology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Wen Yin

    Department of Physiology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Alejandro Mata-Daboin

    Department of Physiology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  7. Simon Bulley

    Department of Physiology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-5985-0489
  8. Jesse Gammons

    Department of Physiology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  9. Salvatore Mancarella

    Department of Physiology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  10. Jonathan H Jaggar

    Department of Physiology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, United States
    For correspondence
    jjaggar@uthsc.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-1505-3335

Funding

National Institutes of Health (HL133256)

  • Jonathan H Jaggar

National Institutes of Health (HL137745)

  • Jonathan H Jaggar

American Heart Association (16SDG27460007)

  • Simon Bulley

American Heart Association (15SDG22680019)

  • M Dennis Leo

American Heart Association (20POST35210200)

  • Charles E MacKay

American Heart Association (16POST30960010)

  • Raquibul Hasan

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Mark T Nelson, University of Vermont, United States

Ethics

Animal experimentation: All procedures were approved by the Animal Care and Use Committee of the University of Tennessee (protocol 17-068.0).

Version history

  1. Received: March 5, 2020
  2. Accepted: May 4, 2020
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: May 4, 2020 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: May 15, 2020 (version 2)
  5. Version of Record updated: June 30, 2020 (version 3)

Copyright

© 2020, MacKay et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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  1. Charles E MacKay
  2. M Dennis Leo
  3. Carlos Fernández-Peña
  4. Raquibul Hasan
  5. Wen Yin
  6. Alejandro Mata-Daboin
  7. Simon Bulley
  8. Jesse Gammons
  9. Salvatore Mancarella
  10. Jonathan H Jaggar
(2020)
Intravascular flow stimulates PKD2 (polycystin-2) channels in endothelial cells to reduce blood pressure
eLife 9:e56655.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.56655

Share this article

https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.56655

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