Long-term potentiation is independent of the C-tail of the GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit

  1. Javier Díaz-Alonso  Is a corresponding author
  2. Wade Morishita
  3. Salvatore Incontro
  4. Jeffrey Simms
  5. Julia Holtzman
  6. Michael Gill
  7. Lennart Mucke
  8. Robert C Malenka
  9. Roger A Nicoll  Is a corresponding author
  1. University of California, San Francisco, United States
  2. Stanford University, United States
  3. Gladstone Institute of Neurological Disease, United States
  4. University of California, San Francisco, United States

Abstract

We tested the proposal that the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the AMPAR subunit GluA1 is required for LTP. We found that a knock-in mouse lacking the CTD of GluA1 expresses normal LTP and spatial memory, assayed by the Morris water maze. Our results support a model in which LTP generates synaptic slots, which capture passively diffusing AMPARs.

Data availability

All data generated or analysed during this study are included in the manuscript and supporting files.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Javier Díaz-Alonso

    Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, United States
    For correspondence
    Javier.DiazAlonso@ucsf.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-4980-7441
  2. Wade Morishita

    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Salvatore Incontro

    Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Jeffrey Simms

    Gladstone Institute of Neurological Disease, San Francisco, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Julia Holtzman

    Gladstone Institute of Neurological Disease, San Francisco, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Michael Gill

    Gladstone Institute of Neurological Disease, San Francisco, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  7. Lennart Mucke

    Gladstone Institute of Neurological Disease, San Francisco, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  8. Robert C Malenka

    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  9. Roger A Nicoll

    Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, United States
    For correspondence
    roger.nicoll@ucsf.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-6977-4632

Funding

National Institute of Mental Health (K99MH118425)

  • Javier Díaz-Alonso

National Institute of Mental Health (R01MH070957)

  • Roger A Nicoll

National Institute of Mental Health (R01MH117139)

  • Roger A Nicoll

National Institute of Mental Health (P50MH086403)

  • Robert C Malenka

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Linda Overstreet-Wadiche, University of Alabama at Birmingham, United States

Ethics

Animal experimentation: The authors declare that this study has been performed strictly following all relevant laboratory animal use regulations according to approved institutional animal care and use committee (IACUC) protocols of the University of California, San Francisco (AN170318 and AN183289), and Stanford University (10322).

Version history

  1. Received: April 18, 2020
  2. Accepted: August 21, 2020
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: August 24, 2020 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: September 18, 2020 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2020, Díaz-Alonso et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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  1. Javier Díaz-Alonso
  2. Wade Morishita
  3. Salvatore Incontro
  4. Jeffrey Simms
  5. Julia Holtzman
  6. Michael Gill
  7. Lennart Mucke
  8. Robert C Malenka
  9. Roger A Nicoll
(2020)
Long-term potentiation is independent of the C-tail of the GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit
eLife 9:e58042.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.58042

Share this article

https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.58042

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