Design issues and solutions for stop-signal data from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development [ABCD] study

Abstract

The Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study is an unprecedented longitudinal neuroimaging sample that tracks the brain development of over 10,000 9-10 year olds through adolescence. At the core of this study are the three tasks that are completed repeatedly within the MRI scanner, one of which is the stop-signal task. In analyzing the available stopping experimental code and data, we identified a set of design issues that we believe significantly compromise its value. These issues include but are not limited to: variable stimulus durations that violate basic assumptions of dominant stopping models, trials in which stimuli are incorrectly not presented, and faulty stop-signal delays. We present eight issues, show their effect on the existing ABCD data, suggest prospective solutions including task changes for future data collection and preliminary computational models, and suggest retrospective solutions for data users who wish to make the most of the existing data.

Data availability

The ABCD dataset is openly available through the NIH Data Archive (https://nda.nih.gov/abcd). Analysis code is available at: http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4458428 and http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4458767.

The following previously published data sets were used

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Patrick G Bissett

    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, United States
    For correspondence
    pbissett@stanford.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-0854-9404
  2. McKenzie P Hagen

    Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Henry M Jones

    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Russell A Poldrack

    Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Funding

The authors declare that there was no funding for this work.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Birte U Forstmann, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands

Version history

  1. Received: June 18, 2020
  2. Accepted: March 3, 2021
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: March 4, 2021 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: March 26, 2021 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2021, Bissett et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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  1. Patrick G Bissett
  2. McKenzie P Hagen
  3. Henry M Jones
  4. Russell A Poldrack
(2021)
Design issues and solutions for stop-signal data from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development [ABCD] study
eLife 10:e60185.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.60185

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https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.60185

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