Regulation of shoot meristem shape by photoperiodic signaling and phytohormones during floral induction of Arabidopsis

  1. Atsuko Kinoshita
  2. Alice Vayssières
  3. René Richter
  4. Qing Sang
  5. Adrian Roggen
  6. Annabel D van Driel
  7. Richard S Smith
  8. George Coupland  Is a corresponding author
  1. Tokyo Metropolitan University, Japan
  2. Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, Germany

Abstract

Floral transition, the onset of plant reproduction, involves changes in shape and identity of the shoot apical meristem (SAM). The change in shape, termed doming, occurs early during floral transition when it is induced by environmental cues such as changes in day-length, but how it is regulated at the cellular level is unknown. We defined the morphological and cellular features of the SAM during floral transition of Arabidopsis thaliana. Both cell number and size increased during doming, and these changes were partially controlled by the gene regulatory network (GRN) that triggers flowering. Furthermore, dynamic modulation of expression of gibberellin biosynthesis and catabolism enzymes at the SAM contributed to doming. Expression of these enzymes was regulated by two MADS-domain transcription factors implicated in flowering. We provide a temporal and spatial framework for integrating the flowering GRN with cellular changes at the SAM, and highlight the role of local regulation of gibberellin.

Data availability

All data generated this study are included in the manuscript and supporting files. Source data files have been provided for Figures 1, 3, 6 and 7 and 8

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Atsuko Kinoshita

    Biological Sciences, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Tokyo, Japan
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-9095-389X
  2. Alice Vayssières

    Plant developmental biology, Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, Cologne, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. René Richter

    Plant developmental biology, Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, Cologne, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-9833-2211
  4. Qing Sang

    Plant developmental biology, Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, Cologne, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Adrian Roggen

    Plant developmental biology, Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, Cologne, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Annabel D van Driel

    Plant developmental biology, Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, Cologne, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-1629-5961
  7. Richard S Smith

    Comparative Development and Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, Cologne, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-9220-0787
  8. George Coupland

    Plant developmental biology, Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, Cologne, Germany
    For correspondence
    coupland@mpipz.mpg.de
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-6988-4172

Funding

Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung

  • Atsuko Kinoshita

Japanese Society for the promotion of Science

  • Atsuko Kinoshita

Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (390686111)

  • George Coupland

Max-Planck-Gesellschaft (Open-access funding)

  • George Coupland

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Hao Yu, National University of Singapore & Temasek Life Sciences Laboratory, Singapore

Version history

  1. Received: July 2, 2020
  2. Accepted: December 12, 2020
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: December 14, 2020 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: December 29, 2020 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2020, Kinoshita et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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  1. Atsuko Kinoshita
  2. Alice Vayssières
  3. René Richter
  4. Qing Sang
  5. Adrian Roggen
  6. Annabel D van Driel
  7. Richard S Smith
  8. George Coupland
(2020)
Regulation of shoot meristem shape by photoperiodic signaling and phytohormones during floral induction of Arabidopsis
eLife 9:e60661.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.60661

Share this article

https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.60661

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