Neural mechanisms underlying expectation-dependent inhibition of distracting information

  1. Dirk van Moorselaar  Is a corresponding author
  2. Eline Lampers
  3. Elisa Cordesius
  4. Heleen A Slagter
  1. Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands
  2. University of Amsterdam, Netherlands

Abstract

Predictions based on learned statistical regularities in the visual worldhave been shown to facilitate attention and goal-directed behavior by sharpening the sensory representation of goal-relevant stimuli in advance. Yet, how the brain learns to ignore predictable goal-irrelevant or distracting information is unclear.Here, we used EEG anda visual search task in which the predictability of a distractor’s location and/or spatial frequency was manipulated to determine how spatial and feature distractor expectations are neurally implemented and reduce distractor interference. We find that expected distractor features could not only be decoded pre-stimulus, but their representation differed from the representation of that same feature when part of the target. Spatial distractor expectations did not induce changes in preparatory neural activity, but a strongly reduced Pd, an ERP index of inhibition. These results demonstrate that neural effects of statistical learning critically depend on the task relevance and dimension (spatial, feature) of predictions

Data availability

All data are publicly available on OSF . Analysis scripts can be downloaded via GitHub

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Dirk van Moorselaar

    Experimental and Applied Psychology, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands
    For correspondence
    dirkvanmoorselaar@gmail.com
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-0491-1317
  2. Eline Lampers

    Brain and Cognition, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Elisa Cordesius

    Brain and Cognition, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Heleen A Slagter

    Experimental and Applied Psychology, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-4180-1483

Funding

H2020 European Research Council (679399)

  • Heleen A Slagter

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Ethics

Human subjects: The ethical committee of the Department of Psychology of the University of Amsterdam approved the study (2018-BC-9051), which was conformed to the Declaration of Helsinki.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Joy Geng

Publication history

  1. Received: July 14, 2020
  2. Accepted: December 14, 2020
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: December 15, 2020 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: December 23, 2020 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2020, van Moorselaar et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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  1. Dirk van Moorselaar
  2. Eline Lampers
  3. Elisa Cordesius
  4. Heleen A Slagter
(2020)
Neural mechanisms underlying expectation-dependent inhibition of distracting information
eLife 9:e61048.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.61048
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