1. Plant Biology
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Pollen Tube Guidance: Growing straight through walls

  1. Subramanian Sankaranarayanan  Is a corresponding author
  2. Sharon A Kessler  Is a corresponding author
  1. Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Purdue University, United States
  2. Purdue Center for Plant Biology, Purdue University, United States
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Cite this article as: eLife 2020;9:e61647 doi: 10.7554/eLife.61647
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Figures

Pollen tube growth in stigma papillae.

When a grain of pollen (shown in mustard) lands on a papilla in the stigma (green) of a flowering plant, a pollen tube (PT; also shown in mustard) begins to grow through the cell wall (CW) of the papilla so that the sperm cells (S; red) in the pollen can be delivered to the female gametes, which are located in ovules deep inside the plant. In stage 12 flowers (left), the organization of the cortical microtubules (CMTs; blue lines) inside the papilla is highly anisotropic and the pollen tube grows in a straight line. In older stage 15 flowers (right), the organization of the microtubules is isotropic and the pollen tube forms a coil around the papilla as it grows. The vegetative cell (V) makes up the body of the pollen tube and encloses the sperm cells.

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