1. Ecology
  2. Neuroscience
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Natural History of Model Organisms: Neurogenomic insights into the behavior and vocal development of the zebra finch

  1. Mark E Hauber  Is a corresponding author
  2. Matthew IM Louder
  3. Simon Grifith
  1. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, United States
  2. Macquarie University, Australia
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Cite this article as: eLife 2021;10:e61849 doi: 10.7554/eLife.61849

Abstract

The zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) is a socially monogamous and colonial opportunistic breeder with pronounced sexual differences in singing and plumage coloration. Its natural history has led to it becoming a model species for research into sex differences in vocal communication, as well as behavioral, neural and genomic theories of imitative auditory learning. As scientists tap into the genetic and behavioral diversity of both wild and captive lineages, the zebra finch will continue to inform research into culture, learning and social bonding, as well as adaptability to a changing climate.

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Article and author information

Author details

  1. Mark E Hauber

    Evolution, Ecology, and Behavior,, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, United States
    For correspondence
    mhauber@illinois.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-2014-4928
  2. Matthew IM Louder

    Evolution, Ecology, and Behavior,, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-4421-541X
  3. Simon Grifith

    Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, North Ryde, Australia
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-7612-4999

Funding

National Science Foundation (IOS1456524)

  • Mark E Hauber

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Helena Pérez Valle, eLife, United Kingdom

Publication history

  1. Received: August 19, 2020
  2. Accepted: June 8, 2021
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: June 9, 2021 (version 1)

Copyright

© 2021, Hauber et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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