1. Cell Biology
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CEP78 functions downstream of CEP350 to control biogenesis of primary cilia by negatively regulating CP110 levels

  1. André B Goncalves
  2. Sarah K Hasselbalch
  3. Beinta B Joensen
  4. Sebastian Patzke
  5. Pernille Martens
  6. Signe K Ohlsen
  7. Mathieu Quinodoz
  8. Konstantinos Nikopoulos
  9. Reem Suleiman
  10. Magnus P Damso Jeppesen
  11. Catja Weiss
  12. Søren Tvorup Christensen
  13. Carlo Rivolta
  14. Jens S Andersen
  15. Pietro Farinelli  Is a corresponding author
  16. Lotte B Pedersen  Is a corresponding author
  1. University of Copenhagen, Denmark
  2. Oslo University Hospital, Norway
  3. University of Southern Denmark, Denmark
  4. University of Basel, Switzerland
  5. University of Lausanne, Switzerland
Research Article
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Cite this article as: eLife 2021;10:e63731 doi: 10.7554/eLife.63731

Abstract

CEP78 is a centrosomal protein implicated in ciliogenesis and ciliary length control, and mutations in the CEP78 gene cause retinal cone-rod dystrophy associated with hearing loss. However, the mechanism by which CEP78 affects cilia formation is unknown. Based on a recently discovered disease-causing CEP78 p.L150S mutation, we identified the disease-relevant interactome of CEP78. We confirmed that CEP78 interacts with the EDD1-DYRK2-DDB1VPRBP E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, which is involved in CP110 ubiquitination and degradation, and identified a novel interaction between CEP78 and CEP350 that is weakened by the CEP78L150S mutation. We show that CEP350 promotes centrosomal recruitment and stability of CEP78, which in turn leads to centrosomal recruitment of EDD1. Consistently, cells lacking CEP78 display significantly increased cellular and centrosomal levels of CP110, and depletion of CP110 in CEP78-deficient cells restored ciliation frequency to normal. We propose that CEP78 functions downstream of CEP350 to promote ciliogenesis by negatively regulating CP110 levels via an EDD1-dependent mechanism.

Data availability

All data generated or analysed during this study are included in the manuscript and supporting files. Source data files have been provided for Figure 3A and Figure 7-figure supplement 2.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. André B Goncalves

    Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Sarah K Hasselbalch

    Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Beinta B Joensen

    Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Sebastian Patzke

    Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Pernille Martens

    Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Signe K Ohlsen

    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  7. Mathieu Quinodoz

    Institute of Molecular and Clinical Ophthalmology Basel (IOB); Department of Ophthalmology, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  8. Konstantinos Nikopoulos

    Department of Computational Biology, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  9. Reem Suleiman

    Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  10. Magnus P Damso Jeppesen

    Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  11. Catja Weiss

    Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  12. Søren Tvorup Christensen

    Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-5004-304X
  13. Carlo Rivolta

    Institute of Molecular and Clinical Ophthalmology Basel (IOB); Department of Ophthalmology, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  14. Jens S Andersen

    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  15. Pietro Farinelli

    Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
    For correspondence
    Pietro.Farinelli@twelve.bio
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  16. Lotte B Pedersen

    Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
    For correspondence
    lbpedersen@bio.ku.dk
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-9749-3758

Funding

Independent Research Fund Denmark (8020‐00162B)

  • Pietro Farinelli
  • Lotte B Pedersen

Carlsberg Foundation (CF18‐0294)

  • Lotte B Pedersen

Independent Research Fund Denmark (8021-00425A)

  • Jens S Andersen

Swiss National Science Foundation (176097)

  • Carlo Rivolta

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Jens Lüders, Institute for Research in Biomedicine, Spain

Publication history

  1. Preprint posted: October 5, 2020 (view preprint)
  2. Received: October 5, 2020
  3. Accepted: July 13, 2021
  4. Accepted Manuscript published: July 14, 2021 (version 1)
  5. Version of Record published: August 10, 2021 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2021, Goncalves et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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