Src activates retrograde membrane traffic through phosphorylation of GBF1

  1. Joanne Chia  Is a corresponding author
  2. Shyi-Chyi Wang
  3. Sheena Wee
  4. David James Gill
  5. Felicia Tay
  6. Srinivasaraghavan Kannan
  7. Chandra S Verma
  8. Jayantha Gunaratne
  9. Frederic A Bard  Is a corresponding author
  1. Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Singapore
  2. Bioinformatics Institute, Singapore

Abstract

The Src tyrosine kinase controls cancer-critical protein glycosylation through Golgi to ER relocation of GALNTs enzymes. How Src induces this trafficking event is unknown. Golgi to ER transport depends on the GTP Exchange factor (GEF) GBF1 and small GTPase Arf1. Here we show that Src induces the formation of tubular transport carriers containing GALNTs. The kinase phosphorylates GBF1 on 10 tyrosine residues; two of them, Y876 and Y898 are located near the C-terminus of the Sec7 GEF domain. Their phosphorylation promotes GBF1 binding to the GTPase; molecular modeling suggests partial melting of the Sec7 domain and intramolecular rearrangement. GBF1 mutants defective for these rearrangements prevent binding, carrier formation and GALNTs relocation, while phosphomimetic GBF1 mutants induce tubules. In sum, Src promotes GALNTs relocation by promoting GBF1 binding to Arf1. Based on residue conservation, similar regulation of GEF-Arf complexes by tyrosine phosphorylation could be a conserved and wide-spread mechanism.

Data availability

Source data of western blots and all quantifications have been provided for all figures.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Joanne Chia

    Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Singapore, Singapore
    For correspondence
    zhchia@imcb.a-star.edu.sg
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  2. Shyi-Chyi Wang

    Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Singapore, Singapore
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  3. Sheena Wee

    Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Singapore, Singapore
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  4. David James Gill

    Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Singapore, Singapore
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  5. Felicia Tay

    Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Singapore, Singapore
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  6. Srinivasaraghavan Kannan

    Atomistic Simulations and Design in Biology, Bioinformatics Institute, Singapore, Singapore
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  7. Chandra S Verma

    Atomistic Simulations and Design in Biology, Bioinformatics Institute, Singapore, Singapore
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  8. Jayantha Gunaratne

    Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Singapore, Singapore
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-5377-6537
  9. Frederic A Bard

    Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Singapore, Singapore
    For correspondence
    fbard@imcb.a-star.edu.sg
    Competing interests
    Frederic A Bard, Reviewing editor, eLife.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-3783-4805

Funding

Astar (Core fund)

  • Frederic A Bard

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Suzanne R Pfeffer, Stanford University School of Medicine, United States

Version history

  1. Preprint posted: August 3, 2020 (view preprint)
  2. Received: March 23, 2021
  3. Accepted: December 5, 2021
  4. Accepted Manuscript published: December 6, 2021 (version 1)
  5. Version of Record published: December 15, 2021 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2021, Chia et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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  1. Joanne Chia
  2. Shyi-Chyi Wang
  3. Sheena Wee
  4. David James Gill
  5. Felicia Tay
  6. Srinivasaraghavan Kannan
  7. Chandra S Verma
  8. Jayantha Gunaratne
  9. Frederic A Bard
(2021)
Src activates retrograde membrane traffic through phosphorylation of GBF1
eLife 10:e68678.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.68678

Share this article

https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.68678

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