Abstract

The sharing of research data is essential to ensure reproducibility and maximize the impact of public investments in scientific research. Here we describe OpenNeuro, a BRAIN Initiative data archive that provides the ability to openly share data from a broad range of brain imaging data types following the FAIR principles for data sharing. We highlight the importance of the Brain Imaging Data Structure (BIDS) standard for enabling effective curation, sharing, and reuse of data. The archive presently shares more than 600 datasets including data from more than 20,000 participants, comprising multiple species and measurement modalities and a broad range of phenotypes. The impact of the shared data is evident in a growing number of published reuses, currently totalling more than 150 publications. We conclude by describing plans for future development and integration with other ongoing open science efforts.

Data availability

The OpenNeuro data repository is accessible at http://openneuro.org. The derived data used to generate the analyses and figures reported here are available at https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5559041

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Christopher J Markiewicz

    Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-6533-164X
  2. Krzysztof J Gorgolewski

    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-3321-7583
  3. Franklin Feingold

    Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  4. Ross Blair

    Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  5. Yaroslav O Halchenko

    Dartmouth University, Hanover, NH, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  6. Eric Miller

    Squishymedia, Portland, OR, United States
    Competing interests
    Eric Miller, EM is owner of Squishymedia which is funded to perform software development work on OpenNeuro..
  7. Nell Hardcastle

    Squishymedia, Portland, OR, United States
    Competing interests
    Nell Hardcastle, NH is an employee of Squishymedia which is funded to perform software development work on OpenNeuro..
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-3837-0707
  8. Joe Wexler

    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  9. Oscar Esteban

    Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-8435-6191
  10. Mathias Goncavles

    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  11. Anita Jwa

    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  12. Russell Poldrack

    Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, United States
    For correspondence
    russpold@stanford.edu
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-6755-0259

Funding

National Institute of Mental Health (R24MH117179)

  • Russell Poldrack

National Institute of Mental Health (R24MH114705)

  • Russell Poldrack

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Thorsten Kahnt, Northwestern University, United States

Version history

  1. Preprint posted: June 29, 2021 (view preprint)
  2. Received: June 29, 2021
  3. Accepted: October 15, 2021
  4. Accepted Manuscript published: October 18, 2021 (version 1)
  5. Version of Record published: October 27, 2021 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2021, Markiewicz et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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  1. Christopher J Markiewicz
  2. Krzysztof J Gorgolewski
  3. Franklin Feingold
  4. Ross Blair
  5. Yaroslav O Halchenko
  6. Eric Miller
  7. Nell Hardcastle
  8. Joe Wexler
  9. Oscar Esteban
  10. Mathias Goncavles
  11. Anita Jwa
  12. Russell Poldrack
(2021)
The OpenNeuro resource for sharing of neuroscience data
eLife 10:e71774.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.71774

Share this article

https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.71774

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