1. Medicine
  2. Neuroscience
Download icon

Vasopressin: Predicting changes in osmolality

  1. Zhe Yang
  2. Tongtong Wang
  3. Yuki Oka  Is a corresponding author
  1. Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, California Institute of Technology, United States
Insight
Cite this article as: eLife 2021;10:e74551 doi: 10.7554/eLife.74551
1 figure

Figures

How drinking and eating alter the activity of AVP neurons.

AVP neurons (middle) help maintain osmolality by releasing a hormone called vasopressin, which reduces the amount of fluids excreted from the kidneys. Eating and drinking have been shown to alter the activity of AVP neurons before there are any detectable changes in blood osmolality. Water cues (such as the presence of a glass) and drinking suppress the release of vasopressin (red line) by activating inhibitory neurons (blue circle) in the MnPO and OVLT regions of the lamina terminalis. Eating, on the other hand, stimulates AVP neurons to release vasopressin (green line) through an unknown population of neurons (red circle) in the arcuate nucleus, the region of the brain that regulates hunger. These neural circuits allow the body to react quickly to the osmotic changes caused by eating and drinking before the balance of fluids in our blood is disrupted.

Download links

A two-part list of links to download the article, or parts of the article, in various formats.

Downloads (link to download the article as PDF)

Download citations (links to download the citations from this article in formats compatible with various reference manager tools)

Open citations (links to open the citations from this article in various online reference manager services)