Single-cell transcriptomics of a dynamic cell behavior in murine airways

  1. Sheldon JJ Kwok
  2. Daniel T Montoro
  3. Adam L Haber
  4. Seok-Hyun Yun  Is a corresponding author
  5. Vladimir Vinarsky  Is a corresponding author
  1. LASE Innovation Inc, United States
  2. Broad Institute, United States
  3. Harvard Medical School, United States
  4. Massachusetts General Hospital, United States

Abstract

Despite advances in high-dimensional cellular analysis, the molecular profiling of dynamic behaviors of cells in their native environment remains a major challenge. We present a method that allows us to couple physiological behaviors of cells in an intact murine tissue to deep molecular profiling of individual cells. This method enabled us to establish a novel molecular signature for a striking migratory cellular behavior following injury in murine airways.

Data availability

Sequencing data have been deposited in GEO under accession code GSE193954.

The following data sets were generated
The following previously published data sets were used

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Sheldon JJ Kwok

    LASE Innovation Inc, Cambridge, United States
    Competing interests
    Sheldon JJ Kwok, Currently an employee of and has financial interests in LASE Innovation Inc..
  2. Daniel T Montoro

    Broad Institute, Cambridge, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-6222-2149
  3. Adam L Haber

    Broad Institute, Cambridge, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  4. Seok-Hyun Yun

    Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, United States
    For correspondence
    seok-hyun_yun@hms.harvard.edu
    Competing interests
    Seok-Hyun Yun, Has financial interests in LASE Innovation Inc. that were reviewed and are managed by Massachusetts General Hospital and Mass General Brigham in accordance with their conflict-of-interest policies..
  5. Vladimir Vinarsky

    Center for Regenerative Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, United States
    For correspondence
    vvinarsky@gmail.com
    Competing interests
    Vladimir Vinarsky, Currently an employee and has financial interest in Vertex Pharmaceuticals, Inc..
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-1141-6434

Funding

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (5P01HL120839)

  • Seok-Hyun Yun

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (5F32HL154638)

  • Daniel T Montoro

National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (P41EB015903)

  • Seok-Hyun Yun

National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (P41EB015903)

  • Seok-Hyun Yun

National Cancer Institute (R01CA192878)

  • Seok-Hyun Yun

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (K08HL124298)

  • Vladimir Vinarsky

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Murim Choi, Seoul National University, Republic of Korea

Ethics

Animal experimentation: Mice were maintained in an Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care-accredited animal facility at the Massachusetts General Hospital, and procedures were performed with Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC)-approved protocol 2009N000119.

Version history

  1. Received: December 23, 2021
  2. Preprint posted: January 31, 2022 (view preprint)
  3. Accepted: April 20, 2023
  4. Accepted Manuscript published: April 21, 2023 (version 1)
  5. Version of Record published: May 11, 2023 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2023, Kwok et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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  1. Sheldon JJ Kwok
  2. Daniel T Montoro
  3. Adam L Haber
  4. Seok-Hyun Yun
  5. Vladimir Vinarsky
(2023)
Single-cell transcriptomics of a dynamic cell behavior in murine airways
eLife 12:e76645.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.76645

Share this article

https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.76645

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