eLife News: in the news

eLife News: in the news

  1. Media coverage: First results of cancer reproducibility project released

    January 19, 2017

    In light of yesterday's media coverage on the first results of the Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology, we released early copies of the full studies, along with an Editorial and other accompanying articles. These materials have today been published in eLife and are now available to read here . The aim of the project, which is a collaboration between the Center for Open Science and Science Exchange, is to assess reproducibility in cancer biology, and to identify what influences its success or failure in science more generally. “The first five papers are part of a substantial effort to...

  2. Media coverage: Complex learning dismantles barriers in the brain

    July 15, 2016

    In their research paper – Massive cortical reorganization in sighted Braille readers – Siuda-Krzywicka, Bola et al. show how learning complex tasks can blur the lines between the separate areas in the brain that process a specific sense. The researchers taught Braille to sighted individuals and found that learning such a complex tactile task activates the visual cortex, when you would only expect it to activate the tactile one. “The textbooks tell us that the visual cortex processes visual tasks while the tactile cortex, called the somatosensory cortex, processes tasks related to touch,” says...

  3. Media coverage: Research funders renew commitment to transforming science publishing

    July 15, 2016

    eLife announced in June that its three founders, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), the Max Planck Society, and the Wellcome Trust are extending their support for the non-profit initiative. The significant new investment affirms eLife successes to date and will boost the organisation’s ambition to help scientists accelerate discovery. eLife aims to make the communication of results more beneficial for the scientific community as a whole, by operating a platform for presenting research that encourages and recognises the most responsible behaviours in science. The high-profile, open-...

  4. Media coverage: Slime can see

    July 08, 2016

    In their research paper – Cyanobacteria use micro-optics to sense light direction – Schuergers et al. reveal how bacterial cells act as the equivalent of a microscopic eyeball or the world’s oldest and smallest camera eye, allowing them to ‘see’. Cyanobacteria are found in huge numbers in water bodies or can form a slippery green film on rocks and pebbles. The species used in the study, Synechocystis , is found naturally in freshwater lakes and rivers. As photosynthesis is crucial to the survival of these bacteria, scientists have sought to understand how they sense light. Previous studies...

  5. More eLife authors are linking submissions to their ORCID iDs

    June 09, 2016

    eLife sees positive results of requiring corresponding authors to register and link their profiles to their ORCID iDs An ORCID iD provides a persistent digital identifier to uniquely identify researchers and unambiguously link them with their research outputs, which in turn helps to improve the discoverability of their work. The overall number of ORCID iDs nearly doubled over the course of 2015. At present there are more than 2.2 million researchers with ORCID iDs ( https://orcid.org/statistics , updated 13/05/2016). In January, eLife was among a group of journals and publishers to pledge in...

  6. Media coverage: Scientists prove key aspect of evolutionary theory

    February 17, 2016

    In their research paper – Population genomics reveals the origin and asexual evolution of human infective trypanosomes – Macleod et al. discuss how they have proved a key aspect of evolutionary theory, which predicts that pairs of chromosomes within asexual organisms will evolve independently of each other and become increasingly different over time in a phenomenon called the ‘Meselson effect’. Dr. Annette Macleod and her team studied a parasite called Trypanosoma brucei gambiense ( T.b. gambiense ), which is responsible for causing African sleeping sickness in humans. In order to demonstrate...

  7. Media coverage: Being anxious could be good for you -- in a crisis

    February 17, 2016

    In their research article – Anxiety dissociates the adaptive functions of sensory and motor response enhancements to social threats – El Zein et al. find that the brain devotes more processing resources to social situations that signal threat than to those that are benign. For the first time, specific regions of the brain have been identified to be involved in the apparent "sixth sense" that we have for danger. The human brain is able to detect social threats in these regions in a fast, automatic fashion, within just 200 milliseconds. The researchers managed to identify what it is that makes...

  8. Media coverage: Generous mothers receive less nagging

    February 17, 2016

    In their research paper – Genetic variation in offspring indirectly influences the quality of maternal behaviour in mice – Ashbrook et al. show that if a mother is already a generous provider, she will be nagged less by her offspring. The study in mice uncovers a fitness cost to begging for care, so pups don’t continue asking for more if they are already well provided. Pups that spend more time soliciting for care weigh less than those that are more easily satisfied. These findings are applicable to any social species, including humans. The level of maternal care was measured as the sum of...

  9. Media coverage: Midnight munchies mangle memory

    February 03, 2016

    In their study - Misaligned feeding impairs memories – Loh et al. suggest that eating at times normally reserved for sleep causes a deficiency in the type of learning and memory controlled by the hippocampal area of the brain. The study shows that some learned behaviours are more affected by late-night snacking than others. The team tested the ability of mice to recognise a novel object. Mice regularly fed during their sleep-time were significantly less able to recall the object. Long-term memory was also dramatically reduced, demonstrated during a fear conditioning experiment. “We have...

  10. Media coverage: "Hunger hormone" is boosted by restricted meal times

    February 03, 2016

    In their study – Hippocampus ghrelin signaling mediates appetite through lateral hypothalamic orexin pathways – Kanoski, Hsu and colleagues find that rats with restricted feeding schedules learn to eat more, helped by the “hunger hormone” ghrelin. The insights could be valuable for helping the researchers develop new effective weight-loss therapies. In the study, once the rats learn they have limited access to food, they are able to increase their food intake until it doubles. Over several days, meal times were restricted to a daily four-hour window, followed by 20 hours with no food. The...

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