1. Computational and Systems Biology
  2. Neuroscience
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Age-dependent electroencephalogram (EEG) patterns during sevoflurane general anesthesia in infants

  1. Laura Cornelissen  Is a corresponding author
  2. Seong-Eun Kim
  3. Patrick L Purdon
  4. Emery N Brown
  5. Charles B Berde
  1. Boston Children's Hospital, United States
  2. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, United States
  3. Massachusetts General Hospital, United States
Research Article
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Cite this article as: eLife 2015;4:e06513 doi: 10.7554/eLife.06513

Abstract

Electroencephalogram (EEG) approaches may provide important information about developmental changes in brain-state dynamics during general anesthesia. We used multi-electrode EEG, analyzed with multitaper-spectral methods and video recording of body movement to characterize the spatiotemporal dynamics of brain activity in 36 infants 0-6 months old when awake, and during maintenance-of and emergence-from sevoflurane general anesthesia. During maintenance: 1)slow-delta oscillations were present in all ages; 2)theta and alpha oscillations emerged around 4months; 3)unlike adults, all infants lacked frontal alpha predominance and coherence. Alpha power was greatest during maintenance, compared to awake and emergence in infants at 4-6months. During emergence, theta and alpha power decreased with decreasing sevoflurane concentration in infants at 4-6months. These EEG dynamic differences are likely due to developmental factors including regional differences in synaptogenesis, glucose metabolism, and myelination across the cortex. We demonstrate the need to apply age-adjusted analytic approaches to develop neurophysiologic-based strategies for pediatric anesthetic state monitoring.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Laura Cornelissen

    Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, United States
    For correspondence
    laura.cornelissen@childrens.harvard.edu
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  2. Seong-Eun Kim

    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.
  3. Patrick L Purdon

    Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care, and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, United States
    Competing interests
    Patrick L Purdon, P.L.P. and E.N.B. have patents pending on brain monitoring during general anesthesia and sedation, and have a patent licensing agreement with Masimo Corporation .Application Numbers: P.L.P & E.N.B.: 20150080754, 20150011907, 20140323898, 20140323897, 20140316218, 20140316217, 20140187973, 20140180160; P.L.P: 20080306397.
  4. Emery N Brown

    Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, United States
    Competing interests
    Emery N Brown, P.L.P. and E.N.B. have patents pending on brain monitoring during general anesthesia and sedation, and have a patent licensing agreement with Masimo Corporation. Application Numbers: P.L.P & E.N.B.: 20150080754, 20150011907, 20140323898, 20140323897, 20140316218, 20140316217, 20140187973, 20140180160; P.L.P: 20080306397.
  5. Charles B Berde

    Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, United States
    Competing interests
    No competing interests declared.

Ethics

Human subjects: Boston Children's Hospital Institutional Review Board (IRB) approved the study (IRB Protocol Number: IRB-P00003544), and informed written consent was obtained from parents/legal guardians before each study. The study conformed to the standards set by the Declaration of Helsinki and Good Clinical Practice guidelines.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Jody C Culham, University of Western Ontario, Canada

Publication history

  1. Received: January 15, 2015
  2. Accepted: June 22, 2015
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: June 23, 2015 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: July 15, 2015 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2015, Cornelissen et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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