1. Neuroscience
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A quantitative framework for whole-body coordination reveals specific deficits in freely walking ataxic mice

  1. Ana S Machado
  2. Dana M Darmohray
  3. Joao Fayad
  4. Hugo G Marques
  5. Megan R Carey  Is a corresponding author
  1. Champalimaud Foundation, Portugal
Research Article
  • Cited 64
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Cite this article as: eLife 2015;4:e07892 doi: 10.7554/eLife.07892

Abstract

The coordination of movement across the body is a fundamental, yet poorly understood aspect of motor control. Mutant mice with cerebellar circuit defects exhibit characteristic impairments in locomotor coordination; however, the fundamental features of this gait ataxia have not been effectively isolated. Here we describe a novel system (LocoMouse) for analyzing limb, head, and tail kinematics of freely walking mice. Analysis of visibly ataxic Purkinje cell degeneration (pcd) mice reveals that while differences in the forward motion of individual paws are fully accounted for by changes in walking speed and body size, more complex 3D trajectories and, especially, inter-limb and whole-body coordination are specifically impaired. Moreover, the coordination deficits in pcd are consistent with a failure to predict and compensate for the consequences of movement across the body. These results isolate specific impairments in whole-body coordination in mice and provide a quantitative framework for understanding cerebellar contributions to coordinated locomotion.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Ana S Machado

    Champalimaud Neuroscience Programme, Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown, Champalimaud Foundation, Lisbon, Portugal
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Dana M Darmohray

    Champalimaud Neuroscience Programme, Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown, Champalimaud Foundation, Lisbon, Portugal
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Joao Fayad

    Champalimaud Neuroscience Programme, Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown, Champalimaud Foundation, Lisbon, Portugal
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Hugo G Marques

    Champalimaud Neuroscience Programme, Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown, Champalimaud Foundation, Lisbon, Portugal
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Megan R Carey

    Champalimaud Neuroscience Programme, Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown, Champalimaud Foundation, Lisbon, Portugal
    For correspondence
    megan.carey@neuro.fchampalimaud.org
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Ethics

Animal experimentation: All procedures were reviewed and performed in accordance with the Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown Ethics Committee guidelines, and approved by the Portuguese Direcção Geral de Veterinária (Ref. No. 0421/000/000/2015).

Reviewing Editor

  1. Indira M Raman, Northwestern University, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: April 2, 2015
  2. Accepted: October 2, 2015
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: October 3, 2015 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: November 10, 2015 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2015, Machado et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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