1. Physics of Living Systems
  2. Developmental Biology
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Unified quantitative characterization of epithelial tissue development

  1. Boris Guirao
  2. Stéphane U Rigaud
  3. Floris Bosveld
  4. Anaïs Bailles
  5. Jesus Lopez-Gay
  6. Shuji Ishihara
  7. Kaoru Sugimura
  8. François Graner
  9. Yohanns Bellaïche  Is a corresponding author
  1. Institut Curie, France
  2. Aix Marseille Université, France
  3. Meiji University, Japan
  4. Kyoto University, Japan
  5. Univsersité Paris-Diderot, France
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Cite this article as: eLife 2015;4:e08519 doi: 10.7554/eLife.08519

Abstract

Understanding the mechanisms regulating development requires a quantitative characterization of cell divisions, rearrangements, cell size and shape changes, and apoptoses. We developed a multiscale formalism that relates the characterizations of each cell process to tissue growth and morphogenesis. Having validated the formalism on computer simulations, we quantifed separately all morphogenetic events in the Drosophila wing and dorsal thorax pupal epithelia to obtain comprehensive statistical maps linking cell and tissue scale dynamics. While globally cell shape changes, rearrangements and divisions all signifcantly participate in tissue morphogenesis, locally, their relative participations display major variations in space and time. By blocking division we analyzed the impact of division on rearrangements, cell shape changes and tissue morphogenesis. Finally, by combining the formalism with mechanical stress measurement, we evidenced unexpected interplays between patterns of tissue elongation, cell division and stress. Our formalism provides a novel and rigorous approach to uncover mechanisms governing tissue development.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Boris Guirao

    Polarity, Division and Morphogenesis Team, Génétique et biologie du développement, Institut Curie, Paris, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Stéphane U Rigaud

    Polarity, Division and Morphogenesis Team, Génétique et biologie du développement, Institut Curie, Paris, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Floris Bosveld

    Polarity, Division and Morphogenesis Team, Génétique et biologie du développement, Institut Curie, Paris, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Anaïs Bailles

    Institut de Biologie du Développement de Marseille, Aix Marseille Université, Paris, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Jesus Lopez-Gay

    Polarity, Division and Morphogenesis Team, Génétique et biologie du développement, Institut Curie, Paris, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Shuji Ishihara

    Department of Physics, School of Science and Technology, Meiji University, Kanagawa, Japan
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  7. Kaoru Sugimura

    Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sceinces, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  8. François Graner

    Laboratoire Matière et Systèmes Complexes, Univsersité Paris-Diderot, Paris, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  9. Yohanns Bellaïche

    Polarity, Division and Morphogenesis Team, Génétique et biologie du développement, Institut Curie, Paris, France
    For correspondence
    yohanns.bellaiche@curie.fr
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Naama Barkai, Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel

Publication history

  1. Received: May 6, 2015
  2. Accepted: November 3, 2015
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: December 12, 2015 (version 1)
  4. Accepted Manuscript updated: December 15, 2015 (version 2)
  5. Version of Record published: March 22, 2016 (version 3)

Copyright

© 2015, Guirao et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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