1. Neuroscience
Download icon

Neural evidence accumulation persists after choice to inform metacognitive judgments

  1. Peter R Murphy  Is a corresponding author
  2. Ian H Robertson
  3. Siobhán Harty
  4. Redmond G O'Connell
  1. Trinity College Dublin, Ireland
Research Article
  • Cited 33
  • Views 2,175
  • Annotations
Cite this article as: eLife 2015;4:e11946 doi: 10.7554/eLife.11946

Abstract

The ability to revise one's certainty or confidence in a preceding choice is a critical feature of adaptive decision-making but the neural mechanisms underpinning this metacognitive process have yet to be characterized. In the present study, we demonstrate that the same build-to-threshold decision variable signal that triggers an initial choice continues to evolve after commitment, and determines the timing and accuracy of self-initiated error detection reports by selectively representing accumulated evidence that the preceding choice was incorrect. We also show that a peri-choice signal generated in medial frontal cortex provides a source of input to this post-decision accumulation process, indicating that metacognitive judgments are not solely based on the accumulation of feedforward sensory evidence. These findings impart novel insights into the generative mechanisms of metacognition.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Peter R Murphy

    Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience, School of Psychology, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
    For correspondence
    murphyp7@tcd.ie
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Ian H Robertson

    Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience, School of Psychology, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Siobhán Harty

    Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience, School of Psychology, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Redmond G O'Connell

    Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience, School of Psychology, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Ethics

Human subjects: We state in our manuscript (p.19):"[Subjects] provided written informed consent, and all procedures were approved by the Trinity College Dublin ethics committee and conducted in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Michael J Frank, Brown University, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: September 29, 2015
  2. Accepted: December 17, 2015
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: December 19, 2015 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: January 28, 2016 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2015, Murphy et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

Metrics

  • 2,175
    Page views
  • 636
    Downloads
  • 33
    Citations

Article citation count generated by polling the highest count across the following sources: Scopus, Crossref, PubMed Central.

Download links

A two-part list of links to download the article, or parts of the article, in various formats.

Downloads (link to download the article as PDF)

Download citations (links to download the citations from this article in formats compatible with various reference manager tools)

Open citations (links to open the citations from this article in various online reference manager services)

Further reading

    1. Neuroscience
    Morgane Roche et al.
    Research Advance Updated
    1. Neuroscience
    Ashley L Juavinett et al.
    Tools and Resources Updated