1. Cell Biology
Download icon

COPI selectively drives maturation of the early Golgi

  1. Effrosyni Papanikou
  2. Kasey J Day
  3. Jotham Austin
  4. Benjamin S Glick  Is a corresponding author
  1. The University of Chicago, United States
Research Article
  • Cited 38
  • Views 2,569
  • Annotations
Cite this article as: eLife 2015;4:e13232 doi: 10.7554/eLife.13232

Abstract

COPI coated vesicles carry material between Golgi compartments, but the role of COPI in the secretory pathway has been ambiguous. Previous studies of thermosensitive yeast COPI mutants yielded the surprising conclusion that COPI was dispensable both for the secretion of certain proteins and for Golgi cisternal maturation. To revisit these issues, we optimized the anchor-away method, which allows peripheral membrane proteins such as COPI to be sequestered rapidly by adding rapamycin. Video fluorescence microscopy revealed that COPI inactivation causes an early Golgi protein to remain in place while late Golgi proteins undergo cycles of arrival and departure. These dynamics generate partially functional hybrid Golgi structures that contain both early and late Golgi proteins, explaining how secretion can persist when COPI has been inactivated. Our findings suggest that cisternal maturation involves a COPI-dependent pathway that recycles early Golgi proteins, followed by multiple COPI-independent pathways that recycle late Golgi proteins.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Effrosyni Papanikou

    Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Kasey J Day

    Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Jotham Austin

    Electron Microscopy Core Facility, The University of Chicago, Chicago, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Benjamin S Glick

    Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, United States
    For correspondence
    bsglick@uchicago.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Chris G Burd, Yale University, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: November 20, 2015
  2. Accepted: December 27, 2015
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: December 28, 2015 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: February 8, 2016 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2015, Papanikou et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

Metrics

  • 2,569
    Page views
  • 736
    Downloads
  • 38
    Citations

Article citation count generated by polling the highest count across the following sources: Scopus, Crossref, PubMed Central.

Download links

A two-part list of links to download the article, or parts of the article, in various formats.

Downloads (link to download the article as PDF)

Download citations (links to download the citations from this article in formats compatible with various reference manager tools)

Open citations (links to open the citations from this article in various online reference manager services)

Further reading

    1. Cell Biology
    2. Human Biology and Medicine
    Prashant Rajbhandari et al.
    Research Article Updated
    1. Cell Biology
    2. Neuroscience
    Antonio Michelucci et al.
    Research Article Updated