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DYT1 dystonia increases risk taking in humans

  1. David Arkadir  Is a corresponding author
  2. Angela Radulescu
  3. Deborah Raymond
  4. Naomi Lubarr
  5. Susan B Bressman
  6. Pietro Mazzoni
  7. Yael Niv  Is a corresponding author
  1. Hadassah Medical Center and the Hebrew University, Israel
  2. Princeton University, United States
  3. Beth Israel Medical Center, United States
  4. Columbia University, United States
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Cite this article as: eLife 2016;5:e14155 doi: 10.7554/eLife.14155

Abstract

It has been difficult to link synaptic modification to overt behavioral changes. Rodent models of DYT1 dystonia, a single-mutation motor disorder, demonstrate increased long-term potentiation and decreased long-term depression in corticostriatal synapses. Computationally, such asymmetric learning predicts risk taking in probabilistic tasks. Here we demonstrate abnormal risk taking in DYT1 dystonia patients, which is correlated with disease severity, thereby supporting striatal plasticity in shaping choice behavior in humans.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. David Arkadir

    Department of Neurology, Hadassah Medical Center, Hadassah Medical Center and the Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel
    For correspondence
    arkadir@gmail.com
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Angela Radulescu

    Psychology Department, Princeton Neuroscience Institute, Princeton University, Princeton, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Deborah Raymond

    Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Naomi Lubarr

    Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Susan B Bressman

    Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Pietro Mazzoni

    The Neurological Institute, Columbia University, New York, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  7. Yael Niv

    Psychology Department, Princeton Neuroscience Institute, Princeton University, Princeton, United States
    For correspondence
    yael@princeton.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Ethics

Human subjects: All participants gave informed consent and the study was approved by the Institutional Review Boards of Columbia University, Beth Israel Medical Center, and Princeton University.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Rui M Costa, Fundação Champalimaud, Portugal

Publication history

  1. Received: January 2, 2016
  2. Accepted: May 28, 2016
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: June 1, 2016 (version 1)
  4. Accepted Manuscript updated: June 2, 2016 (version 2)
  5. Version of Record published: July 19, 2016 (version 3)

Copyright

© 2016, Arkadir et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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