Abstract

Yeast studies identified two heterohexameric tethering complexes, which consist of 4 shared (Vps11, Vps16, Vps18 and Vps33) and 2 specific subunits: Vps3 and Vps8 (CORVET) versus Vps39 and Vps41 (HOPS). CORVET is an early and HOPS is a late endosomal tether. The function of HOPS is well known in animal cells, while CORVET is poorly characterized. Here we show that Drosophila Vps8 is highly expressed in hemocytes and nephrocytes, and localizes to early endosomes despite the lack of a clear Vps3 homolog. We find that Vps8 forms a complex and acts together with Vps16A, Dor/Vps18 and Car/Vps33A, and loss of any of these proteins leads to fragmentation of endosomes. Surprisingly, Vps11 deletion causes enlargement of endosomes, similar to loss of the HOPS-specific subunits Vps39 and Lt/Vps41. We thus identify a 4 subunit-containing miniCORVET complex as an unconventional early endosomal tether in Drosophila.

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Author details

  1. Péter Lőrincz

    Department of Anatomy, Cell and Developmental Biology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Zsolt Lakatos

    Department of Anatomy, Cell and Developmental Biology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Ágnes Varga

    Department of Anatomy, Cell and Developmental Biology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Tamás Maruzs

    Institute of Genetics, Biological Research Centre, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Szeged, Hungary
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Zsófia Simon-Vecsei

    Institute of Genetics, Biological Research Centre, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Szeged, Hungary
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Zsuzsanna Darula

    Laboratory of Proteomics Research, Biological Research Centre, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Szeged, Hungary
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  7. Péter Benkő

    Department of Anatomy, Cell and Developmental Biology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  8. Gábor Csordás

    Institute of Genetics, Biological Research Centre, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Szeged, Hungary
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  9. Mónika Lippai

    Department of Anatomy, Cell and Developmental Biology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  10. István Andó

    Institute of Genetics, Biological Research Centre, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Szeged, Hungary
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  11. Krisztina Hegedűs

    Department of Anatomy, Cell and Developmental Biology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  12. Katalin F Medzihradszky

    Laboratory of Proteomics Research, Biological Research Centre, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Szeged, Hungary
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  13. Szabolcs Takáts

    Department of Anatomy, Cell and Developmental Biology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  14. Gábor Juhász

    Department of Anatomy, Cell and Developmental Biology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary
    For correspondence
    szmrt@elte.hu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Randy Schekman, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California, Berkeley, United States

Version history

  1. Received: January 6, 2016
  2. Accepted: June 1, 2016
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: June 2, 2016 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: July 6, 2016 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2016, Lőrincz et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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  1. Péter Lőrincz
  2. Zsolt Lakatos
  3. Ágnes Varga
  4. Tamás Maruzs
  5. Zsófia Simon-Vecsei
  6. Zsuzsanna Darula
  7. Péter Benkő
  8. Gábor Csordás
  9. Mónika Lippai
  10. István Andó
  11. Krisztina Hegedűs
  12. Katalin F Medzihradszky
  13. Szabolcs Takáts
  14. Gábor Juhász
(2016)
MiniCORVET is a Vps8-containing early endosomal tether in Drosophila
eLife 5:e14226.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14226

Share this article

https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14226

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