1. Developmental Biology
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Muscle contraction is required to maintain the pool of muscle progenitors via YAP and NOTCH during fetal myogenesis

  1. Joana Esteves de Lima
  2. Marie-Ange Bonnin
  3. Carmen Birchmeier
  4. Delphine Duprez  Is a corresponding author
  1. CNRS UMR 7622, IBPS-Developmental Biology Laboratory, France
  2. Max-Delbrück-Center for Molecular Medicine, Germany
Research Article
  • Cited 30
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Cite this article as: eLife 2016;5:e15593 doi: 10.7554/eLife.15593

Abstract

The importance of mechanical activity in the regulation of muscle progenitors during chick development has not been investigated. We show that immobilization decreases NOTCH activity and mimics a NOTCH loss-of-function phenotype, a reduction in the number of muscle progenitors and increased differentiation. Ligand-induced NOTCH activation prevents the reduction of muscle progenitors and the increase of differentiation upon immobilization. Inhibition of NOTCH ligand activity in muscle fibers suffices to reduce the progenitor pool. Furthermore, immobilization reduces the activity of the transcriptional co-activator YAP and the expression of the NOTCH ligand JAG2 in muscle fibers. YAP forced activity in muscle fibers prevents the decrease of JAG2 expression and the number of PAX7+ cells in immobilization conditions. Our results identify a novel mechanism acting downstream of muscle contraction, where YAP activates JAG2 expression in muscle fibers, which in turn regulates the pool of fetal muscle progenitors via NOTCH in a non cell-autonomous manner.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Joana Esteves de Lima

    CNRS UMR 7622, IBPS-Developmental Biology Laboratory, Paris, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Marie-Ange Bonnin

    CNRS UMR 7622, IBPS-Developmental Biology Laboratory, Paris, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Carmen Birchmeier

    Developmental Biology, Max-Delbrück-Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Delphine Duprez

    CNRS UMR 7622, IBPS-Developmental Biology Laboratory, Paris, France
    For correspondence
    delphine.duprez@upmc.fr
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-0248-7417

Funding

Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR-12-BSV1-0038)

  • Delphine Duprez

AFM-Téléthon (AFM N{degree sign}16752/16826)

  • Delphine Duprez

Fondation pour la Recherche Médicale (DEQ20140329500)

  • Delphine Duprez

Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique

  • Delphine Duprez

Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale

  • Delphine Duprez

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Margaret Buckingham, Institut Pasteur, France

Publication history

  1. Received: February 26, 2016
  2. Accepted: August 23, 2016
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: August 24, 2016 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: September 20, 2016 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2016, Esteves de Lima et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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