1. Cell Biology
  2. Computational and Systems Biology
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Global, quantitative and dynamic mapping of protein subcellular localization

  1. Daniel N Itzhak
  2. Stefka Tyanova
  3. Jürgen Cox
  4. Georg HH Borner  Is a corresponding author
  1. Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Germany
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Cite this article as: eLife 2016;5:e16950 doi: 10.7554/eLife.16950

Abstract

Subcellular localization critically influences protein function, and cells control protein localization to regulate biological processes. We have developed and applied Dynamic Organellar Maps, a proteomic method that allows global mapping of protein translocation events. We initially used maps statically to generate a database with localization and absolute copy number information for over 8,700 proteins from HeLa cells, approaching comprehensive coverage. All major organelles were resolved, with exceptional prediction accuracy (estimated at >92%). Combining spatial and abundance information yielded an unprecedented quantitative view of HeLa cell anatomy and organellar composition, at the protein level. We subsequently demonstrated the dynamic capabilities of the approach by capturing translocation events following EGF stimulation, which we integrated into a quantitative model. Dynamic Organellar Maps enable the proteome-wide analysis of physiological protein movements, without requiring any reagents specific to the investigated process, and will thus be widely applicable in cell biology.

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Author details

  1. Daniel N Itzhak

    Department of Proteomics and Signal Transduction, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Martinsried, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Stefka Tyanova

    Department of Proteomics and Signal Transduction, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Martinsried, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Jürgen Cox

    Department of Proteomics and Signal Transduction, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Martinsried, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Georg HH Borner

    Department of Proteomics and Signal Transduction, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Martinsried, Germany
    For correspondence
    borner@biochem.mpg.de
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Ramanujan S Hegde, MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, United Kingdom

Publication history

  1. Received: April 14, 2016
  2. Accepted: June 8, 2016
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: June 9, 2016 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: July 26, 2016 (version 2)
  5. Version of Record updated: July 28, 2016 (version 3)

Copyright

© 2016, Itzhak et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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