Sam68/KHDRBS1-dependent NF-κB activation confers radioprotection to the colon epithelium in γ-irradiated mice

  1. Kai Fu
  2. Xin Sun
  3. Eric M Wier
  4. Andrea Hodgson
  5. Ryan P Hobbs
  6. Fengyi Wan  Is a corresponding author
  1. Johns Hopkins University, United States

Abstract

Previously we reported that Src-associated-substrate-during-mitosis-of-68kDa (Sam68/KHDRBS1) is pivotal for DNA damage-stimulated NF-κB transactivation of anti-apoptotic genes (Fu et al., 2016). Here we show that Sam68 is critical for genotoxic stress-induced NF-κB activation in the γ-irradiated colon and animal and that Sam68-dependent NF-κB activation provides radioprotection to colon epithelium in vivo. Sam68 deletion diminishes γ-irradiation-triggered PAR synthesis and NF-κB activation in colon epithelial cells (CECs), thus hampering the expression of anti-apoptotic molecules in situ and facilitating CECs to undergo apoptosis in mice post whole-body γ-irradiation (WBIR). Sam68 knockout mice suffer more severe damage in the colon and succumb more rapidly from acute radiotoxicity than the control mice following WBIR. Our results underscore the critical role of Sam68 in orchestrating genotoxic stress-initiated NF-κB activation signaling in the colon tissue and whole animal and reveal the pathophysiological relevance of Sam68-dependent NF-κB activation in colonic cell survival and recovery from extrinsic DNA damage.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Kai Fu

    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Xin Sun

    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-2424-8011
  3. Eric M Wier

    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Andrea Hodgson

    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Ryan P Hobbs

    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Fengyi Wan

    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, United States
    For correspondence
    fwan1@jhu.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-9216-9767

Funding

National Institute of General Medical Sciences (R01GM111682)

  • Fengyi Wan

American Cancer Society (RSG-13-052-01-MPC)

  • Fengyi Wan

National Cancer Institute (T32CA009110)

  • Eric M Wier

National Cancer Institute (T32CA009110)

  • Ryan P Hobbs

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Tony Hunter, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, United States

Ethics

Animal experimentation: All animal experiments were performed according to protocol number MO16-H285, approved by the Johns Hopkins University's Animal Care and Use Committee and in direct accordance with the NIH guidelines for housing and care of laboratory animals. Khdrbs1-/- mice and their gender-matched littermate Khdrbs1+/- mice were produced using heterozygous breeding pairs. Mice were maintained in a specific pathogen-free facility and fed autoclaved food and water ad libitum.

Version history

  1. Received: September 29, 2016
  2. Accepted: December 19, 2016
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: December 20, 2016 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: January 4, 2017 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2016, Fu et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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  1. Kai Fu
  2. Xin Sun
  3. Eric M Wier
  4. Andrea Hodgson
  5. Ryan P Hobbs
  6. Fengyi Wan
(2016)
Sam68/KHDRBS1-dependent NF-κB activation confers radioprotection to the colon epithelium in γ-irradiated mice
eLife 5:e21957.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21957

Share this article

https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21957

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