Analogous mechanism regulating formation of neocortical basal radial glia and cerebellar Bergmann glia

  1. Xin Heng
  2. Qiuxia Guo
  3. Alan W Leung
  4. James YH Li  Is a corresponding author
  1. University of Connecticut School of Medicine, United States
  2. Yale University, United States

Abstract

Neocortical basal radial glia (bRG) and cerebellar Bergmann glia (BG) are basal progenitors derived from ventricular apical radial glia (aRG) that selectively lose their apical processes. bRG and BG have been implicated in the expansion and folding of the cerebrum and cerebellum, respectively. Here, we analyzed the molecular characteristics and development of bRG and BG. Transcriptomic comparison revealed striking similarity of the molecular features of bRG and BG. We found that heightened ERK signaling activity in aRG is tightly linked to the temporal formation and the relative abundance of bRG in human and mouse cortices. Forced activation of an FGF-ERK-ETV axis that is crucial to BG induction specifically induced bRG with canonical human bRG features in mice. Therefore, our data point to a common mechanism of bRG and BG generation, bearing implications to the role for these basal progenitors in the evolution of cortical folding of the cerebrum and cerebellum.

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The following previously published data sets were used

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Xin Heng

    Department of Genetics and Genome Sciences, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Qiuxia Guo

    Department of Genetics and Genome Sciences, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Alan W Leung

    Department of Genetics, Yale University, New Haven, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. James YH Li

    Department of Genetics and Genome Sciences, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington, United States
    For correspondence
    jali@uchc.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-9231-2698

Funding

National Institutes of Health (R01MH094914)

  • James YH Li

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Ethics

Animal experimentation: This study was performed in strict accordance with the recommendations in the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals of the National Institutes of Health. All of the animals were handled according to approved institutional animal care and use committee (IACUC) protocols (101159-0918) of the University of Connecticut Health. All surgery was performed under sodium pentobarbital anesthesia, and every effort was made to minimize suffering.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Constance L Cepko, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard Medical School, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: November 16, 2016
  2. Accepted: May 9, 2017
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: May 10, 2017 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: June 2, 2017 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2017, Heng et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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  1. Xin Heng
  2. Qiuxia Guo
  3. Alan W Leung
  4. James YH Li
(2017)
Analogous mechanism regulating formation of neocortical basal radial glia and cerebellar Bergmann glia
eLife 6:e23253.
https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23253
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