1. Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine
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Reactive oxygen species-dependent Toll/NF-kB activation in the Drosophila hematopoietic niche confers resistance to wasp parasitism

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Cite this article as: eLife 2017;6:e25496 doi: 10.7554/eLife.25496

Abstract

Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in the adult mammalian bone marrow ensure blood cell renewal. Their cellular microenvironment, called 'niche', regulates hematopoiesis both under homeostatic and immune stress conditions. In the Drosophila hematopoietic organ, the lymph gland, the posterior signalling center (PSC) acts as a niche to regulate the hematopoietic response to immune stress such as wasp parasitism. This response relies on the differentiation of lamellocytes, a cryptic cell type, dedicated to pathogen encapsulation and killing. Here, we establish that Toll/NF-kB pathway activation in the PSC in response to wasp parasitism non-cell autonomously induces the lymph gland immune response. Our data further establish a regulatory network where co-activation of Toll/NF-kB and EGFR signaling by ROS levels in the PSC/niche controls lymph gland hematopoiesis under parasitism. Whether a similar regulatory network operates in mammals to control emergency hematopoiesis is an open question.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Isabelle Louradour

    Centre de Biologie du Développement, Université de Toulouse, Toulouse, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Anurag Sharma

    Centre de Biologie du Développement, Université de Toulouse, Toulouse, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Ismaël Morin-Poulard

    Centre de Biologie du Développement, Université de Toulouse, Toulouse, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Manon Letourneau

    Centre de Biologie du Développement, Université de Toulouse, Toulouse, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Alain Vincent

    Centre de Biologie du Développement, Université de Toulouse, Toulouse, France
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-2769-7501
  6. Michèle Crozatier

    Centre de Biologie du Développement, Université de Toulouse, Toulouse, France
    For correspondence
    michele.crozatier-borde@univ-tlse3.fr
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  7. Nathalie Vanzo

    Centre de Biologie du Développement, Université de Toulouse, Toulouse, France
    For correspondence
    nathalie.vanzo@univ-tlse3.fr
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-6659-0299

Funding

Agence Nationale de la Recherche (bench grant and post-doc felllowship)

  • Michèle Crozatier

Fondation ARC pour la Recherche sur le Cancer (Graduate Student Fellowship)

  • Isabelle Louradour

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Bruno Lemaître, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland

Publication history

  1. Received: February 3, 2017
  2. Accepted: October 29, 2017
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: November 1, 2017 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: November 10, 2017 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2017, Louradour et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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Further reading

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