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Dopamine-dependent scaling of subthalamic gamma bursts with movement velocity in patients with Parkinson's disease

  1. Roxanne Lofredi  Is a corresponding author
  2. Wolf-Julian Neumann
  3. Antje Bock
  4. Andreas Horn
  5. Julius Huebl
  6. Sandy Siegert
  7. Gerd-Helge Schneider
  8. Joachim K Krauss
  9. Andrea A Kühn  Is a corresponding author
  1. Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany
  2. Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Germany
Research Article
  • Cited 3
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Cite as: eLife 2018;7:e31895 doi: 10.7554/eLife.31895

Abstract

Gamma synchronization increases during movement and scales with kinematic parameters. Here, disease-specific characteristics of this synchronization and the dopamine-dependence of its scaling in Parkinson's disease are investigated. In 16 patients undergoing deep brain stimulation surgery, movements of different velocities revealed that subthalamic gamma power peaked in the sensorimotor part of the subthalamic nucleus, correlated positively with maximal velocity and negatively with symptom severity. These effects relied on movement-related bursts of transient synchrony in the gamma band. The gamma burst rate highly correlated with averaged power, increased gradually with larger movements and correlated with symptom severity. In the dopamine-depleted state, gamma power and burst rate significantly decreased, particularly when peak velocity was slower than ON medication. Burst amplitude and duration were unaffected by the medication state. We propose that insufficient recruitment of fast gamma bursts during movement may underlie bradykinesia as one of the cardinal symptoms in Parkinson's disease.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Roxanne Lofredi

    Department of Neurology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany
    For correspondence
    roxanne.lofredi@charite.de
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon 0000-0002-1845-8250
  2. Wolf-Julian Neumann

    Department of Neurology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon 0000-0002-6758-9708
  3. Antje Bock

    Department of Neurology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Andreas Horn

    Department of Neurology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Julius Huebl

    Department of Neurology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Sandy Siegert

    Department of Neurology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  7. Gerd-Helge Schneider

    Department of Neurosurgery, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  8. Joachim K Krauss

    Department of Neurosurgery, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Hannover, Germany
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  9. Andrea A Kühn

    Department of Neurology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany
    For correspondence
    andrea.kuehn@charite.de
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Funding

Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG KFO247)

  • Andrea A Kühn

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Ethics

Human subjects: All participants provided written informed conset which was approved by the local review boeards of the Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin and Hannover Medical School and in accordance with the standards set by the Declaration of Helsinki (EA2/071/08).

Reviewing Editor

  1. Eilon Vaadia, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel

Publication history

  1. Received: September 11, 2017
  2. Accepted: January 29, 2018
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: February 1, 2018 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: February 20, 2018 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2018, Lofredi et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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