1. Chromosomes and Gene Expression
  2. Genetics and Genomics
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Modulation of Prdm9-controlled meiotic chromosome asynapsis overrides hybrid sterility in mice

  1. Sona Gregorova
  2. Vaclav Gergelits  Is a corresponding author
  3. Irena Chvatalova
  4. Tanmoy Bhattacharyya
  5. Barbora Valiskova
  6. Vladana Fotopulosova
  7. Petr Jansa
  8. Diana Wiatrowska
  9. Jiri Forejt  Is a corresponding author
  1. Institute of Molecular Genetics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Czech Republic
Research Article
  • Cited 19
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Cite this article as: eLife 2018;7:e34282 doi: 10.7554/eLife.34282

Abstract

Hybrid sterility is one of the reproductive isolation mechanisms leading to speciation. Prdm9, the only known vertebrate hybrid sterility gene, causes failure of meiotic chromosome synapsis and infertility in male hybrids between two mouse subspecies. But within species Prdm9 determines the sites of programmed DNA double-strand breaks and meiotic recombination hotspots. To investigate the relation between Prdm9-controlled meiotic arrest and asynapsis, we inserted random stretches of consubspecific homology on several autosomal pairs in sterile hybrids and analyzed their ability to form synaptonemal complexes and rescue male fertility. Twenty-seven or more Mb of consubspecific (belonging to the same subspecies) homology fully restored synapsis in a given autosomal pair and we predicted that two or more DSBs within symmetric hotspots per chromosome are necessary for successful meiosis. We hypothesize that impaired recombination between evolutionarily diverged chromosomes could function as one of the mechanisms of hybrid sterility occurring in various sexually reproducing species.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Sona Gregorova

    Institute of Molecular Genetics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Vestec, Czech Republic
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Vaclav Gergelits

    Institute of Molecular Genetics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Vestec, Czech Republic
    For correspondence
    vaclav.gergelits@img.cas.cz
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-5178-8833
  3. Irena Chvatalova

    Institute of Molecular Genetics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Vestec, Czech Republic
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Tanmoy Bhattacharyya

    Institute of Molecular Genetics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Vestec, Czech Republic
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  5. Barbora Valiskova

    Institute of Molecular Genetics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Vestec, Czech Republic
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  6. Vladana Fotopulosova

    Institute of Molecular Genetics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Vestec, Czech Republic
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  7. Petr Jansa

    Institute of Molecular Genetics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Vestec, Czech Republic
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  8. Diana Wiatrowska

    Institute of Molecular Genetics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Vestec, Czech Republic
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  9. Jiri Forejt

    Institute of Molecular Genetics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Vestec, Czech Republic
    For correspondence
    jforejt@img.cas.cz
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-2793-3623

Funding

Czech Science Fundation (13-08078S)

  • Jiri Forejt

Charles University Grant Agency of The Czech Republic (435416)

  • Vaclav Gergelits
  • Barbora Valiskova

Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of The Czech Republic (LQ1604 project of the NSPII)

  • Jiri Forejt

Charles University Grant Agency of The Czech Republic (17115)

  • Vaclav Gergelits
  • Barbora Valiskova

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Ethics

Animal experimentation: The mice were maintained at the Institute of Molecular Genetics in Prague and Vestec, Czech Republic. The project was approved by the Animal Care and use Committee of the Institute of Molecular Genetics AS CR, protocol No 141/2012. The principles of laboratory animal care Czech Act No. 246/1992 Sb., compatible with EU Council Directive 86/609/EEC and Apendix of the Council of Europe Convention ETS, were observed.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Scott Keeney, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: December 12, 2017
  2. Accepted: March 13, 2018
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: March 14, 2018 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: April 16, 2018 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2018, Gregorova et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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