1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
  2. Cell Biology
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Synergy between the small intrinsically disordered protein Hsp12 and trehalose sustain viability after desiccation

  1. Skylar Xantus Kim
  2. Gamze Çamdere
  3. Xuchen Hu
  4. Douglas Koshland  Is a corresponding author
  5. Hugo Tapia  Is a corresponding author
  1. University of California, Berkeley, United States
Research Article
  • Cited 10
  • Views 1,538
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Cite this article as: eLife 2018;7:e38337 doi: 10.7554/eLife.38337

Abstract

Anhydrobiotes are rare microbes, plants and animals that tolerate severe water loss. Understanding the molecular basis for their desiccation tolerance may provide novel insights into stress biology and critical tools for engineering drought-tolerant crops. Using the anhydrobiote, budding yeast, we show that trehalose and Hsp12, a small intrinsically disordered protein (sIDP) of the hydrophilin family, synergize to mitigate completely the inviability caused by the lethal stresses of desiccation. We show that these two molecules help to stabilize the activity and prevent aggregation of model proteins both in vivo and in vitro. We also identify a novel in vitro role for Hsp12 as a membrane remodeler, a protective feature not shared by another yeast hydrophilin, suggesting that sIDPs have distinct biological functions.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Skylar Xantus Kim

    Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  2. Gamze Çamdere

    Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Xuchen Hu

    Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, United States
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Douglas Koshland

    Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, United States
    For correspondence
    koshland@berkeley.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-3742-6294
  5. Hugo Tapia

    Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, United States
    For correspondence
    hugo.tapia@berkeley.edu
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-1901-2151

Funding

G Harold and Leila Y. Mathers Foundation

  • Skylar Xantus Kim
  • Hugo Tapia

Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation

  • Gamze Çamdere

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Anthony A Hyman, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Germany

Publication history

  1. Received: May 13, 2018
  2. Accepted: July 15, 2018
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: July 16, 2018 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: July 20, 2018 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2018, Kim et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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