1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
  2. Cell Biology
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Science Forum: The Brazilian Reproducibility Initiative

  1. Olavo B Amaral  Is a corresponding author
  2. Kleber Neves
  3. Ana P Wasilewska-Sampaio
  4. Clarissa FD Carneiro
  1. Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
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Cite this article as: eLife 2019;8:e41602 doi: 10.7554/eLife.41602

Abstract

Most efforts to estimate the reproducibility of published findings have focused on specific areas of research, even though science is usually assessed and funded on a regional or national basis. Here we describe a project to assess the reproducibility of findings in biomedical science published by researchers based in Brazil. The Brazilian Reproducibility Initiative is a systematic, multi-center effort to repeat between 60 and 100 experiments: the project will focus on a set of common laboratory methods, repeating each experiment in three different laboratories. The results, due in 2021, will allow us to estimate the level of reproducibility of biomedical science in Brazil, and to investigate what the published literature can tell us about the reproducibility of research in a given area.

Data availability

All data cited in the article is available at the project's site at the Open Science Framework (https://osf.io/6av7k/).

The following data sets were generated

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Olavo B Amaral

    Institute of Medical Biochemistry Leopoldo de Meis, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
    For correspondence
    olavo@bioqmed.ufrj.br
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-4299-8978
  2. Kleber Neves

    Institute of Medical Biochemistry Leopoldo de Meis, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Ana P Wasilewska-Sampaio

    Institute of Medical Biochemistry Leopoldo de Meis, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  4. Clarissa FD Carneiro

    Institute of Medical Biochemistry Leopoldo de Meis, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0001-8127-0034

Funding

Instituto Serrapilheira

  • Olavo B Amaral

CNPq

  • Clarissa FD Carneiro

The project's funder (Instituto Serrapilheira) made suggestions on the study design, but had no role in data collection and interpretation, or in the decision to submit the work for publication. K. N. and A.P.W.S. are supported by post-doctoral scholarships within this project. C.F.D.C. is supported by a PhD scholarship from CNPq.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Peter A Rodgers, eLife, United Kingdom

Publication history

  1. Received: September 3, 2018
  2. Accepted: January 25, 2019
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: February 5, 2019 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: February 13, 2019 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2019, Amaral et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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