1. Epidemiology and Global Health
  2. Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics
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Electron cryo-microscopy of Bacteriophage PR772 reveals the elusive vertex complex and the capsid architecture

  1. Hemanth KN Reddy  Is a corresponding author
  2. Janos Hajdu
  3. Marta Carroni
  4. Martin Svenda  Is a corresponding author
  1. Uppsala University, Sweden
  2. Stockholm University, Sweden
Research Article
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Cite this article as: eLife 2019;8:e48496 doi: 10.7554/eLife.48496

Abstract

Bacteriophage PR772, a member of the Tectiviridae family, has a 70-nm diameter icosahedral protein capsid that encapsulates a lipid membrane, dsDNA, and various internal proteins. An icosahedrally averaged CryoEM reconstruction of the wild-type virion and a localized reconstruction of the vertex region reveal the composition and the structure of the vertex complex along with new protein conformations that play a vital role in maintaining the capsid architecture of the virion. The overall resolution of the virion is 2.75 Å, while the resolution of the protein capsid is 2.3 Å. The conventional penta-symmetron formed by the capsomeres is replaced by a large vertex complex in the pseudo T=25 capsid. All the vertices contain the host-recognition protein, P5; two of these vertices show the presence of the receptor-binding protein, P2. The 3D structure of the vertex complex shows interactions with the viral membrane, indicating a possible mechanism for viral infection.

Article and author information

Author details

  1. Hemanth KN Reddy

    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden
    For correspondence
    hemanth.kumar@icm.uu.se
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-4698-8005
  2. Janos Hajdu

    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
  3. Marta Carroni

    Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-7697-6427
  4. Martin Svenda

    Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden
    For correspondence
    Martin.Svenda@icm.uu.se
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Funding

Vetenskapsrådet (828-2012-108)

  • Janos Hajdu

Vetenskapsrådet (628-2008-1109)

  • Janos Hajdu

Vetenskapsrådet (822-2010-6157)

  • Janos Hajdu

Vetenskapsrådet (822-2012-5260)

  • Janos Hajdu

Knut och Alice Wallenbergs Stiftelse (KAW-2011.081)

  • Janos Hajdu

European Research Council (ERC-291602)

  • Janos Hajdu

Vetenskapsrådet (349-2011-6488)

  • Janos Hajdu

Vetenskapsrådet (2015-06107)

  • Janos Hajdu

European Structural and Investment Funds (CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_003/0000447)

  • Janos Hajdu

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Sjors HW Scheres, MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, United Kingdom

Publication history

  1. Received: May 15, 2019
  2. Accepted: September 9, 2019
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: September 12, 2019 (version 1)
  4. Version of Record published: September 18, 2019 (version 2)

Copyright

© 2019, Reddy et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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